Archive for August 6th, 2009

Wind energy news roundup

Wind energy news roundup

Around €22.6 billion will be spent on offshore wind power projects globally through 2013, according to a report released by Douglas-Westwood.

read more


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Jobs in Solar: PV Design Engineer (Vista, CA)
Date: 2009-08-05, 4:01PM PDT
Reply to: job-ypk24-1307950982@craigslist.org

Photovoltaic Design Engineer

Are you looking to accelerate your career with a company that is well positioned in one today’s fastest growing industries? Are you an experienced Photovoltaic Design Engineer with a minimum of 2 years experience in the industry? If so, we’d like to talk with you…

Independent Energy Solutions, Inc. (IES) is one of the nation’s most respected commercial photovoltaic design / build firms. We are headquartered in North County San Diego and enjoy an extraordinary reputation with clients that include SDG&E, Qualcomm, Pfizer, the U.S. Navy, Camp Pendleton, and many more… IES designs and builds commercial PV systems of all types, including roof-mounted systems, ground-mounted systems, solar carport/shade structures, complex hybrid and off-grid generation plants.

IES is currently experiencing rapid growth and are searching for an experienced Photovoltaic Design Engineer with a track record of success.

As an IES PV Design Engineer, you will work with an experience team to developed engineered drawings for commercial and utility scale solar / PV projects throughout the world. In this role you will be responsible for:

• Reviewing project requirements, RFP’s and proposals
• Completing jobsite visits as required to evaluate site conditions, shading concerns, electrical tie-ins, and other items that will impact system design and constructability.
• Evaluating Fire Department Requirements and incorporate requirements into designs
• Creating Array Layouts and Single-Line Electrical Drawings for Rooftop, Ground-mounted, and Solar Carport Structures (both grid-tied and off grid)
• Working closely with Electrical and Structural Engineering firms as necessary
• Facilitating both internal and external plan review processes
• Initiating requests for meter & main AC disconnect switch location approvals with relevant utility
• Assist in initiating CSI reservation application process to CCSE or other facilitator
• Creating Bills of Materials based on project design drawings
• Performing wire sizing and voltage drop calculations
• Facilitating final sign-offs with engineering firms, and client representatives.
• Obtain PE stamps/ signatures
• Prepare submittal drawings “For Construction”. Obtain permits and notices to proceed
• Prepare as-built drawings
• Create and submit Operation and Maintenance Manuals

Minimum Required Qualifications:

• 2+ years experience as a Design Engineer in the PV / Photovoltaic Industry
• 3+ years experience creating engineered drawings with AutoCAD or AutoCAD Lite (2008).
• Fundamental working knowledge of NEC Codes (including Article 690) and structural codes relevant to various PV array configurations.
• Strong working knowledge of construction drawings and electrical line drawings
• Proficient with MS Office Suite (Word, Excel, and Outlook)
• Strong written and oral communication and interpersonal skills.
• Ability to effectively prioritize and execute tasks in a high-pressure environment.
• This position requires access to sensitive military bases and therefore requires a clean background check (no felonies), U.S. born citizenship, a clean DMV record, and a clean drug-test.

Strongly Preferred Qualifications:

• Experience with REVIT
• Experience with Sketch-up
• Bachelors Degree in Engineering (Electrical / Power)

Work Environment:

• Occasional travel may be required (including some overnight travel).
• Ability to walk construction job sites and climb ladders is necessary.
• Dexterity of hands and fingers to operate a computer keyboard, mouse, and other devices and objects.
• Overtime may be required to meet project deadlines.

Please email your resume and wage requirements to careers@indenergysolutions.com

Location: Vista, CA

  • Compensation: $55K -$70K DOE
  • Principals only. Recruiters, please don’t contact this job poster.
  • Please, no phone calls about this job!
  • Please do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

eSolar Ushers in New Era of Solar Energy with Unveiling of Sierra Power Plant

LANCASTER, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–With 24,000 mirrors glimmering under the Antelope Valley summer sun, eSolar, a leading provider of modular, scalable solar thermal power technology, today unveiled its 5-megawatt (MW) Sierra SunTower solar power plant. The full-scale power plant, the only power tower of its kind in the U.S., produces electricity for Southern California Edison (NYSE: EIX) and can power more than 4,000 homes in California’s Antelope Valley.

The eSolar technology resolves many of the problems that have held back large scale solar in the past including cost, speed of deployment and proximity to existing transmission lines. eSolar uses advanced software algorithms to precisely focus thousands of mirrors on a single point to efficiently harvest the sun’s energy and achieve economies of scale with a smaller footprint than anyone else in the business.

“Today, we unveil a new blueprint for solar energy – one that leverages Moore’s law rather than more steel,” said Bill Gross, CEO of eSolar. “Sierra is just the beginning. Soon eSolar technology will be deployed worldwide to provide clean, affordable energy to hundreds of thousands of homes.”

Constructed in less than one year, eSolar’s Sierra SunTower power plant marks the first of several developments in the Antelope Valley region using eSolar technology. Over the course of construction, this project created 300 jobs.

“With today’s historic plant opening, eSolar is proving that California’s energy and environmental leadership are advancing carbon-free, cost-effective energy that can be used around the world,” said Governor Schwarzenegger. “Through measures such as AB 32 and the California Solar Initiative, I have worked to create an environment that allows companies such as eSolar to thrive in our state – creating green jobs, boosting our economy and preparing us for the energy demands of the future.”

eSolar received the support and cooperation of the City of Lancaster throughout the construction process. “The City of Lancaster is proud to be home to the nation’s newest solar power tower plant. This plant and eSolar’s progressive growth plans throughout the Antelope Valley are the crown jewels in our ongoing effort to truly become the Alternative Energy Capital of the World,” said R. Rex Parris, Mayor of Lancaster.

eSolar develops its California projects on parcels of previously disturbed private lands, avoiding many of the permitting and environmental pitfalls of development on pristine desert lands. Located in northern Lancaster, Sierra SunTower is built on private land designated for heavy industrial use. The decision to site projects solely on private land is unique within the utility-scale solar industry, and the distinction has garnered support from local environmental advocates.

“eSolar demonstrates that pristine wildlands do not have to be sacrificed in order to keep the lights on with clean energy,” remarked David Myers, Executive Director of the Wildlands Conservancy. “eSolar’s efforts to reduce its impact on the surrounding environment demonstrates a level of foresight we hope to see from other solar developers in the future.”

Sierra SunTower was fully financed and developed by eSolar, proving the rapid deployment, pre-fabricated method eSolar patented and pioneered. Building on Sierra’s success, eSolar will deploy many more plants around the country and around the world. In February, eSolar announced an agreement with NRG Energy, Inc. (NYSE: NRG) to develop three plants in California and New Mexico that will generate up to 465 megawatts of electricity using eSolar technology. Additionally, in March, eSolar licensed its technology to India-based ACME Group for approximately 1 gigawatt of eSolar solar thermal capacity.

“Today we take an important step to a new dawn of power generation,” said David Crane, President and CEO of NRG Energy. “With eSolar demonstrating the commercial viability of solar thermal power on a large scale, and with NRG planning to implement the technology at scale across the Southwest, we will begin to harness the sun to power our lives.”

Streaming live at 10 am PST and on demand immediately following the event: http://esolar.com/news/video_sierra



Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

2

2

Filed under: , ,

Toyota Highlander FCHV-adv – click to enlarge

Toyota has covered long distances in its hydrogen fuel cell vehicles before, going from Osaka to Tokyo (347 miles) in a Highlander FCHV in 2007 and also going 2,300 miles (with refueling) from Fiarbanks, Alaska to Vancouver that same year. Now, the improved version of the Highlander FCHV, called the FCHV-adv (hey, it’s advanced) was able to cover 431 miles on one 6 kilogram tank on California roads. Well, no. What Toyota is actually announcing is that their field tests have resulted in “an estimated range of 431 miles on a single full tank of compressed hydrogen gas,” which is about equal to an average fuel economy of 68.3 miles/kg (approximate mpg equivalent). Toyota representatives and others drove two FCHV-advs from Torrance to San Diego and back, a 331.5 mile trip, and then calculated how much H2 was left in the 10,000 psi tank.

Toyota’s Irv Miller said in a statement that Toyota’s hydrogen technology is progressing quickly and that TMS plans “to bring to market a reliable and durable fuel cell vehicle with exceptional fuel economy and zero emissions, at an affordable price” in 2015. We’ve heard recently that this vehicle will not just be affordable, but priced “shockingly low.”

See a video of the drive after the jump.

[Source: Toyota]

Continue reading Toyota pushes Highlander FCHV-adv to 431 miles on one tank of H2

Toyota pushes Highlander FCHV-adv to 431 miles on one tank of H2 originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Thu, 06 Aug 2009 14:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Japan Intends to Expand Hydrogen Highway System for Whole Country

I’ve already talked about the Japanese hydrogen highway system that has been growing over the past few years. Now, the plan is for Japan to extend this hydrogen highway system for the entire country by 2015.

This is good news for Japanese car manufacturers such as Toyota, Nissan and Mazda that all have their own brands of hydrogen cars in various stages of testing and / or fleet testing. This is especially good for Toyota who has publically stated their intention to rollout their commercial hydrogen fuel cell SUVs by 2015.

Tokyo Gas Company, Nippon Oil Corporation plus 11 other companies in the consortium are putting their resources together to commercialize hydrogen production and distribution.

According to Nikkei.com, “The research alliance will conduct field trials by setting up dozens of hydrogen stations across Japan. By using the oil companies’ hydrogen production facilities and the pipelines of the gas companies, the group will research ways to transport the fuel to filling stations in a stable manner at low cost.

“Some of the stations are to be built in urban areas and on highways, such as at existing gasoline-pumping depots. The group hopes to eventually lower supply costs to levels comparable to gasoline.”

While Japan and the European Union are racing to put up hydrogen fueling station post-haste, the U. S. is still muddling along with a few demonstration projects here and there with many critics whining about how hydrogen doesn’t make sense. What doesn’t make sense is falling behind the competition.

Japan, the European Union, China, India, Brazil and even Russia all see the value of producing hydrogen vehicles to reduce emissions and increase energy independence, so one would think the U. S. would be even more enthusiastic.

In a few years do we really want to be playing catch up with these countries that are already mass producing hydrogen cars and we haven’t even started yet? Do we want to bailout the U. S. automakers again because they have once again fallen behind the foreign competition?

Playing catch up doesn’t make sense. The U. S. is supposed to be a technological leader and not a follower.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Full water ahead: GM reminds us that hydrogen is a "key" long-term solution

Filed under: ,

Not that we really expect to hear anything different from GM, but even with the company’s most vocal hydrogen proponent Larry Burns set to retire, The General is sticking to the line that it is committed to bringing H2 vehicles to market. Beth Lowery, GM vice president of environment, energy and safety policy, posted to the GM Fastlane a few follow-ups to her recent webchat and directly addressed the hydrogen question:

We still believe that in the long-term hydrogen can be a key solution to the issues we face around energy supplies and the environmental impacts of personal transportation. Our work on fuel cell technology includes our “Project Driveway” test program. It has yielded great feedback on the performance and capabilities of the Chevy Equinox Fuel Cell vehicle in real-world driving situations. However, hydrogen infrastructure is still an important hurdle we face that requires collaborative efforts by government, academic and industry partners.

Lowery also re-emphasized GM’s near-term commitment to hybrid and flexfuel vehicles. Read her post here. Recently, Lowery also said that GM expects future generations of the Voltec technology will allow GM to turn a profit from plug-in hybrids.

[Source: GM Fastlane]

Full water ahead: GM reminds us that hydrogen is a “key” long-term solution originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Thu, 06 Aug 2009 07:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Full water ahead: GM reminds us that hydrogen is a "key" long-term solution

Filed under: ,

Not that we really expect to hear anything different from GM, but even with the company’s most vocal hydrogen proponent Larry Burns set to retire, The General is sticking to the line that it is committed to bringing H2 vehicles to market. Beth Lowery, GM vice president of environment, energy and safety policy, posted to the GM Fastlane a few follow-ups to her recent webchat and directly addressed the hydrogen question:

We still believe that in the long-term hydrogen can be a key solution to the issues we face around energy supplies and the environmental impacts of personal transportation. Our work on fuel cell technology includes our “Project Driveway” test program. It has yielded great feedback on the performance and capabilities of the Chevy Equinox Fuel Cell vehicle in real-world driving situations. However, hydrogen infrastructure is still an important hurdle we face that requires collaborative efforts by government, academic and industry partners.

Lowery also re-emphasized GM’s near-term commitment to hybrid and flexfuel vehicles. Read her post here. Recently, Lowery also said that GM expects future generations of the Voltec technology will allow GM to turn a profit from plug-in hybrids.

[Source: GM Fastlane]

Full water ahead: GM reminds us that hydrogen is a “key” long-term solution originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Thu, 06 Aug 2009 07:58:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Wastewater Produces Electricity And Desalinates Water
A process that cleans wastewater and generates electricity can also remove 90 percent of salt from brackish water or seawater, according to an international team of researchers from China and the US.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Investors get messy with bugs, worms and nuclear fusion
Weird science rules the week’s transactions as we spot nine VC rounds, plus 22 other deals in the cleantech sector.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Secretary of Energy: Breakthroughs Essential to Fully Meet Nation’s Energy Challenges
Today, the U.S. Department of Energy announced $377 million in funding to establish 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) pursuing potentially path-breaking basic and translational research at the cutting-edge of clean energy innovation. Of this funding, $277 comes from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA, otherwise known as the stimulus package) and $100 million comes from the DOE’s FY2009 budget. The funding will be sustained over the next five years, with the DOE committing $100 million of its budget to the research centers each year.

“Meeting the challenge to reduce our dependence on imported oil and curtail greenhouse gas emissions will require significant scientific advances,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu as he announced the new funding for EFRCs. “These centers will mobilize the enormous talents and skills of our nation’s scientific workforce in pursuit of the breakthroughs that are essential to expand the use of clean and renewable energy.”

The majority of EFRCs are based in universities, with several harnessing the skills and resources of the national laboratories, and just three awarded to non-profit organizations and private corporations. Over the course of the program, these centers will employ over 1,800 people in research into four primary realms: Renewable and Carbon-Neutral Energy (including Solar Energy Utilization, Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Biofuels, and Geological Sequestration of CO2); Energy Efficiency (Clean and Efficient Combustion, Solid State Lighting, Superconductivity); Energy Storage (Hydrogen Research, Electrical Energy Storage); and Crosscutting Science (Catalysis, Materials under Extreme Environments).

A few examples of the research this funding will support include (full list here):

  • Columbia University will focus on achieving higher sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiencies from thin film solar photovoltaics.
  • Cornell University will focus on advanced battery chemistry and design that could enable affordable electric vehicles or mass on-grid energy storage
  • University of Texas-Austin will focus on advanced materials used in energy storage technologies.
  • Purdue University will focus on improved conversion of biomass to energy, fuels or chemicals.

To be sure, this funding should be celebrated – this research is crucial to developing the scientific foundation for breakthrough energy technologies. It is a great (small) step. But the time has long since come to fully invest in our nation’s innovators and the cutting-edge research essential to both improve today’s clean energy technologies and to achieve breakthroughs that pave the way for the transformational energy technologies of tomorrow. Both forms of support are necessary to make clean energy cheap.

Unfortunately, total U.S. spending on energy research, development and deployment is in a sorry state. I noted yesterday that the entire budget for ARPA-e (a newly funded government agency centered on high-risk, high-reward energy research) is less than talk show personality Rush Limbaugh’s latest contract. In total the U.S. government spent about $4 billion on energy research in 2007 (the same as the Navy’s phone bill that year by the way). That figure is thankfully up somewhat, with this new infusion of innovation investment in the stimulus and President Obama’s FY 2009 budget, but still just barely tops $5 billion. In contrast, the United States spends over $30 billion annually to pursue cures to deadly diseases and improve human health through the National Institutes of Health – evidence of the scale of a true national innovation priority.

While spending on energy research is expected to be higher this year than in recent years (in large part due to the stimulus), we need a sustained commitment to clean energy that reflects the scale of our mounting energy and climate challenge. The Waxman-Markey climate and energy bill, currently promoted as the next driver of a clean energy economy, would invest only about $1.2 billion annually in energy research and development and roughly $10 billion in the clean energy sector as a whole – less than 0.1 percent of U.S. GDP. In contrast, South Korea is investing a full 2 percent of its GDP in clean technologies, and China is planning to invest $44-66 billion annually to build their own modern clean energy industries and infrastructure. We must inspire and empower our nation’s youth to become the next generation of energy innovators by fully funding President Obama’s RE-ENERGYSE initiative, and we must build and expand upon this new funding for Energy Frontier Research Centers as just the first launching pad into the next frontiers of clean energy deployment.

Cross-posted at The Breakthrough Institute


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Another WI utility considers out-of-state wind development

From an article by Judy Newman in the Wisconsin State Journal:

MGE Energy is taking the first steps toward creating two more wind farms, both in Iowa.

MGE, parent company of Madison Gas & Electric, has signed agreements to buy land development rights for wind generation sites near Wellsburg and Hawkeye, in northeast Iowa. Terms of the deals were not immediately disclosed and no proposals have been sent to state regulators, but the projects, if built, could total $300 million to $400 million, said Don Peterson, MGE executive director of energy products and services.

The Wellsburg site could house up to 84 wind turbines and the Hawkeye acreage could hold about 20, Peterson said. Total maximum output: 175 megawatts, enough to power more than 85,000 homes when the wind is at peak levels.

RPM Access, of West Des Moines, Iowa, has been collecting wind data for the past year, said Peterson.

“It looks very promising,” he said.

To put the news into the perspective of lost jobs and economic development for Wisconsin, read Michael Vickerman’s commentary.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Ford Developing Laser Powered Spark Plug for Future Engines

The auto industry is pursuing various ways to implement more effective fuel saving strategies. Some of them are based on the development of new technology, electric motors, batteries, etc and others are just improving classic petrol-fueled engines to run better. Following the second trend, engineers from The University of Liverpool, UK, in collaboration with Ford and UK-based GSI Group developed a prototype engine ignition based on lasers rather than on spark plugs.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Bonner and Ass. Pissed us Off

Bonner and Ass. Pissed us Off
Cross posted from actionfactorydc.blogspot.com

Bonner and Associates pissed us off, so a few of us at the Action Factory, a group of young climate activists living and working in DC, took our clothes off in the rain to demonstrate the NAKED FRAUD of this astroturf lobbying firm.
Bonner and associate, who were working for the Hawthorne Group, whom in turn were working for American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity, forged not 1, not 6, but 12 letters to not 1 but 3 congressmen. All three of these companies are outraged, claiming to have fired the ‘deviant’ employee who supposedly acted on his or her own. They were so ‘outraged’ that they didn’t notify the congressmen who received these letters. They were so ‘outraged’ that they even forgot that Bonner has been caught using almost the same tactics before, making them look very stupid for hiring them in the first place. That’s pretty much blind with outrage.

Once the intense anger of the moment subsided, we grabbed a camera and headed back to Bonner’s office first thing Monday morning to get to the bottom of this. Keep in mind, we’re not professional journalists, and I apologize in advance if our ‘outrage’ clouds our judgment on ethical conduct. But, I think that you’ll enjoy joining us on this search for democracy. Bonner and Associates seems to have stolen it, so it only made sense to start looking at the scene of the crime…


Some thoughts:
*People seem pretty unsure of whether forging letters is illegal
*We’re not legal experts – what are the legal consequences for mail fraud? forging names and signatures? Lying to congress?
Update:
Sierra Club’s letter to the DOJ spells out some of the legalese and next steps. Read it on the Wonk Room

Also, watch Rachel Maddow’s ongoing series on “Unnatural Mail Enhancement”


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Shouldn’t Energy Innovation be Worth More than Rush Limbaugh?!
Despite President Obama’s call for an energy revolution, it is up to Congress to provide funding. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-e) made a recent call for research proposals into “high-risk, high-payoff transformational energy-related R&D,” for projects that “(1) translate scientific discoveries and cutting-edge inventions into technological innovations and (2) accelerate transformational technological advances in areas that industry by itself is not likely to undertake because of high technical or financial risk.”

Over 3,500 research teams submitted proposals for a slice of the available $150 million. As a result, over 98% of applicants we “discouraged” from submitting a full application.

Sure, some of the applications were “undoubtedly unrealistic, fundamentally flawed, written in crayon, or the like,” as Andrew Revkin aptly noted at Dot Earth. But with 98% of all proposals rejected, there’s got to be another explanation for the high rejection rate as well. Surely at least 5%, 10%, maybe even one third of these proposals are worth further consideration. Remember: this round of project proposals was simply to get into the next round of consideration where ARPA-e program managers would being the real project grant selection process. No, the reason so many proposals were rejected has more to do with the fact that there is simply not nearly enough money to fund all the good, potentially game-changing clean energy ideas out there.

This problem is not unique to this ARPA-e or this round of research proposals. It is a chronic symptom of this country’s (under)commitment to clean energy. For FY 2009, ARPA-E received $15 million, just enough to cover operating expenses, to say nothing about grants for research. The agency did receive $400 million from the stimulus, which is the source for this round of proposals, and may last through a year or two of project grants. Although the stimulus funding is admirable, it is nowhere near the sustained level of energy funding needed to transform our energy system. In 2007, the federal government spent just $4 billion on energy-related R&D, which was just 3 percent of total federal R&D investments and a measly 0.03 percent of GDP.

Here are a few comparisons to help illustrate the scale of money I’m talking about.

  • $150 million: The amount of funding for the recent ARPA-E grants. The State of Wisconsin alone is dedicating $150 million to clean energy projects, albeit for clean energy deployment (not research).
  • $400 million: Amount of funding for ARPA-E in the stimulus. Rush Limbaugh’s extended contract in 2008 was worth $400 million as was former Exxon Chairman Lee Raymond’s retirement package in 2006.
  • $3 billion: That’s how much money the U.S. invests each year in defense-related innovation through DARPA alone. DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (responsible for funding the invention of the Internet, GPS, among many others) is the highly-regarded inspiration for ARPA-e and provides a good example of what a fully-funded federal innovation agency looks like. (By the way, total annual defense-related R&D spending tops $80 billion annually!)
  • $4 billion: Amount federal government spent on energy research in 2007. Also how much the Navy paid in phone bills that same year.
  • $30 and $84 billion: Amounts Japan and South Korea are spending on energy research and support for new clean energy technologies over the next 5 years.
  • $30 billion is also the amount the U.S. government invests every year in the National Institutes of Health, as we pursue cures to ravaging diseases. That is what a national commitment to research and innovation really looks like. We’ll know that the U.S. is truly serious about clean energy innovation when it invests at least the same order of magnitude in energy R&D as we spend on health care research ever year.
  • $440-660 billion: Amount China is reportedly investing in their clean energy technologies and industries over the next ten years.

Oh, and don’t expect private investments to make up the difference. The Brookings Institute estimated that in 2007 private sector investments in R&D were at only $2.4 billion, and investments have declined since the recent economic meltdown. Individual biotech companies invest more in R&D than the entire energy industry combined. In short, current U.S. investments in energy are pretty much chump change – and it’s time we got serious about remedying that fact.

The federal government, specifically Congress, must provide adequate funding for energy research if we are to take the nation’s mounting energy challenges seriously. $150 million for ARPA-E projects is a start (a small one), but we should increase federal energy innovation spending by at least $15 billion per year to make the scale of commitment necessary to make a difference in our nation’s energy challenges – and even more if we are to compete in the clean energy race with countries like Japan, South Korea and China.

Cross-posted at Breakthrough Generation


Visit the original post at: Energy News

404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /getlinks.php was not found on this server.


Apache/2.2.15 (CentOS) Server at prsape.jasonnevins.ru Port 80