Archive for August 7th, 2009

Toyota Highlander Hydrogen FCHV ADV Gets 68 MPG

Toyota along with the Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) decided to test the automaker’s hydrogen SUV for mileage and range in real world conditions.

A little over a year ago, I had talked about the Toyota Highlander Hydrogen Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle – Advanced having a 516 mile range. In real world conditions, however, which includes stop and go driving during rush hour traffic in Los Angeles, the Highlander today is able to achieve a 431 mile range.

This also translates to 68.3 miles per kilogram (equivalent to a gallon) for the 14 hour round trip from Torrance, California to Santa Monica to San Diego and back. The point of the drive was not to test the best case scenario that the Toyota Hydrogen FCHV could achieve.

Rather the point was to check out how the fuel cell hybrid vehicle performed under real world conditions which included rush hour bumper-to-bumper traffic, driving in stop and go fashion on surface streets, accelerating rapidly on the highways and decelerating at a quick pace.

The NREL and SRNL engineers calculated the driving range along with average miles per gallon equivalent under all driving conditions.

According to the Toyota press release, “For comparison, the 2009 Toyota Highland Hybrid achieves an EPA-estimated rating of 26 mpg combined fuel economy and has a full-tank range of approximately 450 miles. With premium grade gasoline currently priced at about $3.25, the gasoline-powered V6 Highlander hybrid is estimated to travel approximately 26 miles at a cost of about $3.25.

“Currently, hydrogen gas pricing is not fixed, but DOE targets future pricing at $2 to $3 per kilogram. Therefore, the FCHV-adv is estimated to travel approximately 68 miles at a projected cost of about $2.50 – more than double the range of the Highlander Hybrid, at equal or lesser cost, while producing zero emissions.”

Critics often point out the high cost of hydrogen gas right now (which will come down over time). What these same critics fail to point out however is that a hydrogen vehicle getting 68 mpg is using ½ the fuel of a vehicle getting 34 mpg, so even at current prices hydrogen cars fair comparatively well to gasoline powered vehicles.

With this testing, Toyota is making a solid case for hydrogen cars and vehicles. No battery electric car today can come anywhere near the range of the Toyota Highlander Hydrogen FCHV – ADV.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Buyers go overboard in NHPC’s oversubscribed IPO
India’s largest hydropower producer gets more than it bargained for, with investment demand likely to put the deal at the top of its price band.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Climate Change = Watertech Boom

Climate Change = Watertech Boom

Necessity is the mother of invention, and real needs will grow with climate change.

The most fundamental of these is the need for fresh water.

Despite predicted long-term water stress across a wide swathe of agricultural states like California,  we will have to find ways to grow the food we need. All kinds of novel adaptations must be made, from recycling water to learning to grow food in salt water and to reusing water that we do have.

Read more of this story »


Visit the original post at: Energy News

UK startup scores £1M for carbon-negative cement
Novacem, a spin out from Imperial Innovations, thinks its technology could transform the cement industry from an emitter to an
absorber of carbon dioxide.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

UK Supermarket Turns 5,000 Tons Of Meat Into Energy

It’s an odd week for fuel sources. On the heels of a Mountain Dew powered engine, UK supermarket Tesco is getting flack for turning meat into energy–yah, you read that right.

The food chain is burning 5,000 tons of inedible meat for fuel. The biomass processing is being handled by the Cheshire-based PDM Group. The meat-energy is then used to power UK homes via the National Grid.

In fact, Tesco says they dispose of enough old meat to power 600 homes a year!

Read more of this story »


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Todd Stern Needs High Fives

Todd Stern Needs High Fives
There’s a lot of negative energy out there, with tea-baggers disrupting town halls, lobbyists forging fake letters, and a the growing frenzy that seems to be engulfing politics in this country. If this is how the fight for clean energy and health care reform is going to be won, and we feel like we have the people and resources to make our case strongly, than we need to step up to this challenge today.

But lets keep something in mind: we will never win by being more ass-holish than the ass-holes. We’ll never be more sleazy, and we’ll never be as good at saying ‘No’. Even those of us that oppose the violent and dangerous coal industry are committed to offering peaceful and prosperous solutions. We, as a movement for clean energy, are positive, constructive force for change.

This week has been so busy, that this piece didn’t get nearly the attention it deserved, and I want to bring it up now as we close out the week, as an positive example. Sometimes our champions just need some encouragement, they just need some high fives, so they can go fight for what we know we need.

Cross posted from ActionFactoryDC.blogspot.com, by Oscar

Mysterious youngsters clad with monochromatic signs asking for a “Strong Global Climate Treaty” appeared early Thursday morning in front of the State Department Building in Washington DC.

State employees as well as unaware commuters were welcomed by the unusual sight of individuals aligned down the street holding signs that read “Strong Global Climate Treaty, Needs Todd Stern, Todd Stern, Needs Hope, High Five,” where one of them masked as Todd Stern (Special Envoy on Climate Change for the United States) awaited them with a raised hand ready to receive the support that he needs in the form of high fives.



Besides providing an unusual sight and an unfamiliar welcome to State Department employees, these young people are holding Mr. Stern accountable for the responsibilities that his position entails, and asking him to step up and push congress to provide America with a stronger climate bill, which will in turn allow the United States to have a positive presence in Copenhagen this December at the International Climate Change Negotiations.


While the tactic used by the group to convey their message may be lighthearted, their ask is serious: A strong Global Climate Treaty is not only necessary, it’s urgent. The administration, including President Obama and State Secretary Hillary Clinton, along with the White House and State Department, must be held accountable for the promises they made on the campaign trail and continue to make in office. Supporting strong climate legislation is the most effective way to keep their promises and ensure that America leads the world to a clean energy future.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis
In case you missed the story yesterday in the Economist:

How long till the lights go out?

North Sea gas has served Britain well, but supply peaked in 1999. Since then the flow has fallen by half; by 2015 it will have dropped by two-thirds. By 2015 four of Britain’s ten nuclear stations will have shut and no new ones could be ready for years after that. As for coal, it is fiendishly dirty: Britain will be breaking just about every green promise it has ever made if it is using anything like as much as it does today. Renewable energy sources will help, but even if the wind and waves can be harnessed (and Britain has plenty of both), these on-off forces cannot easily replace more predictable gas, nuclear and coal power. There will be a shortfall—perhaps of as much as 20GW—which, if nothing radical is done, will have to be met from imported gas. A large chunk of it may come from Vladimir Putin’s deeply unreliable and corrupt Russia.

Many of Britain’s neighbours may find this rather amusing. Britain, the only big west European country that could have joined the oil producers’ club OPEC, the country that used to lecture the world about energy liberalisation, is heading towards South African-style power cuts, with homes and factories plunged intermittently into third-world darkness.

For more background on Britain’s situation, see also The looming electricity crunch.

I thought about these issues a lot when I lived in Scotland. Britain is clearly facing a crisis, and how they address it will be instructive to those of us who are concerned about energy shortages. I always said that Britain will ultimately conclude that they have to have a lot of new nuclear power, but it looks like that recognition won’t come in time to help them. So what’s the answer? They start ramping coal back up – breaking those green promises – or they start to suffer power outages. What do you think they will do? As I have said before, when the power starts to go out, environmental concerns will fly out the window. Sure, people like the idea of not burning coal. But will they give up power 6 hours a day to achieve that? I don’t think too many of them will.

Of course there is still natural gas from Russia, and I think they are going to have to roll the dice in the short term and hope Russia doesn’t hold them hostage. Longer term, LNG terminals would seem to make sense to me, but they don’t seem to be a part of the discussion here.

Ultimately, I think Britain will behave as the rest of the world will behave when faced with energy crunches. They will find that renewables can’t step up and fill the gap, and so they will roll out conservation measures and make do with whatever it takes to avoid crippling power outages: No matter if it takes coal, natural gas, or the blubber from baby seals. This is how I expect the world to respond when renewable dreams meet the reality of power shortages.



Visit the original post at: Energy News

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis
In case you missed the story yesterday in the Economist:

How long till the lights go out?

North Sea gas has served Britain well, but supply peaked in 1999. Since then the flow has fallen by half; by 2015 it will have dropped by two-thirds. By 2015 four of Britain’s ten nuclear stations will have shut and no new ones could be ready for years after that. As for coal, it is fiendishly dirty: Britain will be breaking just about every green promise it has ever made if it is using anything like as much as it does today. Renewable energy sources will help, but even if the wind and waves can be harnessed (and Britain has plenty of both), these on-off forces cannot easily replace more predictable gas, nuclear and coal power. There will be a shortfall—perhaps of as much as 20GW—which, if nothing radical is done, will have to be met from imported gas. A large chunk of it may come from Vladimir Putin’s deeply unreliable and corrupt Russia.

Many of Britain’s neighbours may find this rather amusing. Britain, the only big west European country that could have joined the oil producers’ club OPEC, the country that used to lecture the world about energy liberalisation, is heading towards South African-style power cuts, with homes and factories plunged intermittently into third-world darkness.

For more background on Britain’s situation, see also The looming electricity crunch.

I thought about these issues a lot when I lived in Scotland. Britain is clearly facing a crisis, and how they address it will be instructive to those of us who are concerned about energy shortages. I always said that Britain will ultimately conclude that they have to have a lot of new nuclear power, but it looks like that recognition won’t come in time to help them. So what’s the answer? They start ramping coal back up – breaking those green promises – or they start to suffer power outages. What do you think they will do? As I have said before, when the power starts to go out, environmental concerns will fly out the window. Sure, people like the idea of not burning coal. But will they give up power 6 hours a day to achieve that? I don’t think too many of them will.

Of course there is still natural gas from Russia, and I think they are going to have to roll the dice in the short term and hope Russia doesn’t hold them hostage. Longer term, LNG terminals would seem to make sense to me, but they don’t seem to be a part of the discussion here.

Ultimately, I think Britain will behave as the rest of the world will behave when faced with energy crunches. They will find that renewables can’t step up and fill the gap, and so they will roll out conservation measures and make do with whatever it takes to avoid crippling power outages: No matter if it takes coal, natural gas, or the blubber from baby seals. This is how I expect the world to respond when renewable dreams meet the reality of power shortages.



Visit the original post at: Energy News

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis

Britain’s Impending Energy Crisis
In case you missed the story yesterday in the Economist:

How long till the lights go out?

North Sea gas has served Britain well, but supply peaked in 1999. Since then the flow has fallen by half; by 2015 it will have dropped by two-thirds. By 2015 four of Britain’s ten nuclear stations will have shut and no new ones could be ready for years after that. As for coal, it is fiendishly dirty: Britain will be breaking just about every green promise it has ever made if it is using anything like as much as it does today. Renewable energy sources will help, but even if the wind and waves can be harnessed (and Britain has plenty of both), these on-off forces cannot easily replace more predictable gas, nuclear and coal power. There will be a shortfall—perhaps of as much as 20GW—which, if nothing radical is done, will have to be met from imported gas. A large chunk of it may come from Vladimir Putin’s deeply unreliable and corrupt Russia.

Many of Britain’s neighbours may find this rather amusing. Britain, the only big west European country that could have joined the oil producers’ club OPEC, the country that used to lecture the world about energy liberalisation, is heading towards South African-style power cuts, with homes and factories plunged intermittently into third-world darkness.

For more background on Britain’s situation, see also The looming electricity crunch.

I thought about these issues a lot when I lived in Scotland. Britain is clearly facing a crisis, and how they address it will be instructive to those of us who are concerned about energy shortages. I always said that Britain will ultimately conclude that they have to have a lot of new nuclear power, but it looks like that recognition won’t come in time to help them. So what’s the answer? They start ramping coal back up – breaking those green promises – or they start to suffer power outages. What do you think they will do? As I have said before, when the power starts to go out, environmental concerns will fly out the window. Sure, people like the idea of not burning coal. But will they give up power 6 hours a day to achieve that? I don’t think too many of them will.

Of course there is still natural gas from Russia, and I think they are going to have to roll the dice in the short term and hope Russia doesn’t hold them hostage. Longer term, LNG terminals would seem to make sense to me, but they don’t seem to be a part of the discussion here.

Ultimately, I think Britain will behave as the rest of the world will behave when faced with energy crunches. They will find that renewables can’t step up and fill the gap, and so they will roll out conservation measures and make do with whatever it takes to avoid crippling power outages: No matter if it takes coal, natural gas, or the blubber from baby seals. This is how I expect the world to respond when renewable dreams meet the reality of power shortages.



Visit the original post at: Energy News

Canadian Solar, Guodian Power sign PV JV
New agreement puts Beijing power generation company on track to achieve 510 megawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity in China by 2012.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Canadian Solar, Guodian Power sign PV JV
New agreement puts Beijing power generation company on track to achieve 510 megawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity in China by 2012.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Canadian Solar, Guodian Power sign PV JV
New agreement puts Beijing power generation company on track to achieve 510 megawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity in China by 2012.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Canadian Solar, Guodian Power sign PV JV
New agreement puts Beijing power generation company on track to achieve 510 megawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity in China by 2012.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Canadian Solar, Guodian Power sign PV JV
New agreement puts Beijing power generation company on track to achieve 510 megawatts of installed photovoltaic capacity in China by 2012.


Visit the original post at: Energy News