Archive for April 18th, 2010

Atlanta-based Suniva Powers India’s Commonwealth Games Stadium With 1 MW Rooftop Solar PV System

Keeping its promise to make the 2010 Commonwealth Games the ‘greenest ever‘, India hired services of Atlanta-based Suniva and Reliance Industries’ Solar Energy Group to install the largest rooftop solar energy power system in the country at the Thyagaraj Stadium.

Suniva was chosen to supply its thin film mono-crystalline solar cells that have efficiency up to 20 percent. The company was founder by the current CTO Ajeet Rahotgi who is also a professer at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Benefitting from the close ties with Georgia Tech, the company was able to license this high efficiency solar cell technology.

Suniva has been expanding its base in India. Last month it commissioned a 3 MW solar PV plant in Karnataka which supplies power to local farmers for irrigation.

(more…)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Atlanta-based Suniva Powers India’s Commonwealth Games Stadium With 1 MW Rooftop Solar PV System

Keeping its promise to make the 2010 Commonwealth Games the ‘greenest ever‘, India hired services of Atlanta-based Suniva and Reliance Industries’ Solar Energy Group to install the largest rooftop solar energy power system in the country at the Thyagaraj Stadium.

Suniva was chosen to supply its thin film mono-crystalline solar cells that have efficiency up to 20 percent. The company was founder by the current CTO Ajeet Rahotgi who is also a professer at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Benefitting from the close ties with Georgia Tech, the company was able to license this high efficiency solar cell technology.

Suniva has been expanding its base in India. Last month it commissioned a 3 MW solar PV plant in Karnataka which supplies power to local farmers for irrigation.

(more…)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

DOE Issues Request for Information for Stationary Fuel Cell Manufacturing Research

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking feedback from the research community and relevant stakeholders to assist in the development of a planned funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for new manufacturing research activities aimed to reduce fuel cell costs and improve the quality and reliability of high temperature (~160-800 °C), Combined Heat and Power (CHP) fuel cells.

Technologies can include, but are not limited to, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); Polybenzimidazole (PBI) Fuel Cells; Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells (PAFC); and Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells (MCFC) for stationary power applications.

With the potential to achieve up to 85% overall efficiencies with lower emissions for combined heat and power generation, CHP fuel cells for stationary applications have become an obvious area of interest to the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program. More specifically, the Manufacturing element of the FCT Program seeks to reduce the capital cost of these systems by approximately 1/3 to $2000/kW by 2015 based solely on manufacturing processes.

DOE is specifying four areas of interest in its RFI:

  1. Balance of Plant (BOP)
  2. Manufacturing of Stack Components (membranes, electrodes, interconnects, seals, etc)
  3. Stack Integration and Assembly
  4. Interests related to Capital Cost Reduction through Manufacturing

Comments must be received no later than 11:59 PM EDT on 13 May 2010.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

ARIES Biodiesel System Delivered to Naval Base Ventura County

The first ARIES (Automated Real-time, Remote, Integrated Energy System) biodiesel production system has been delivered to Naval Base Ventura County. ARIES is the result of a collaborative effort by the US Navy, Biodiesel Industries and Aerojet to produce biodiesel using local resources. (Earlier post.)

ARIES is a highly automated, transportable biodiesel production unit that can be controlled from a remote location. These features ensure reliable process control and optimal production yields in a sustainable system that can be readily and widely deployed.

ARIES incorporates Aerojet’s systems control technologies to provide real-time sensing and management of key chemistry and processing parameters. These technologies, coupled with Biodiesel Industries’ production database, allow automation of the entire process, resulting in enhanced yields, reliable quality control and personnel safety assurance. Remote sensing also enables monitoring and operation from a single data and process control center for biodiesel production facilities in numerous

locations around the world.

The capacity of the Modular Production Unit (MPU) is 3-10 million gallons per year. A ruggedized 100,000 gallon Mini-MPU is available for military use.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

ARIES Biodiesel System Delivered to Naval Base Ventura County

The first ARIES (Automated Real-time, Remote, Integrated Energy System) biodiesel production system has been delivered to Naval Base Ventura County. ARIES is the result of a collaborative effort by the US Navy, Biodiesel Industries and Aerojet to produce biodiesel using local resources. (Earlier post.)

ARIES is a highly automated, transportable biodiesel production unit that can be controlled from a remote location. These features ensure reliable process control and optimal production yields in a sustainable system that can be readily and widely deployed.

ARIES incorporates Aerojet’s systems control technologies to provide real-time sensing and management of key chemistry and processing parameters. These technologies, coupled with Biodiesel Industries’ production database, allow automation of the entire process, resulting in enhanced yields, reliable quality control and personnel safety assurance. Remote sensing also enables monitoring and operation from a single data and process control center for biodiesel production facilities in numerous

locations around the world.

The capacity of the Modular Production Unit (MPU) is 3-10 million gallons per year. A ruggedized 100,000 gallon Mini-MPU is available for military use.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

Dayton RTA Adding 10 Gillig Hybrid Buses

The Dayton, Ohio RTA is adding 10 hybrid buses to its fleet, which also includes electric trolley buses. The hybrids, manufactured by Gillig, use the GM-Allison parallel hybrid drive system.

Dayton RTA used two-thirds of the stimulus money it received in spring, 2009, to buy buses, offsetting the cost of fleet replacement and reducing the agency’s budget deficit.

RTA purchased the hybrids along with a package of several 40-foot diesel and medium-duty buses at a total cost of $13.3 million.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

Dayton RTA Adding 10 Gillig Hybrid Buses

The Dayton, Ohio RTA is adding 10 hybrid buses to its fleet, which also includes electric trolley buses. The hybrids, manufactured by Gillig, use the GM-Allison parallel hybrid drive system.

Dayton RTA used two-thirds of the stimulus money it received in spring, 2009, to buy buses, offsetting the cost of fleet replacement and reducing the agency’s budget deficit.

RTA purchased the hybrids along with a package of several 40-foot diesel and medium-duty buses at a total cost of $13.3 million.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

World’s First "Carbon Negative" Car Concept at Expo 2010 in Shanghai
SAIC Ye Zi - Leaf - electric concept car at Expo 2010 image
Image: autohome China

SAIC-GM sponsors the award-winning pavilion at the Expo 2010 in Shanghai with the theme Take a drive to 2030. The concept car Shanghai Automotive Industry Corp. plans to show at the Expo (more images in the extended) betrays tremendous pressure to set the highest standard. Combining all of the wildest dreams of electric vehicle buffs into one co… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Bright Ideas in Earthquake-Safe, Ecofriendly Building
earthquake safe building methods poster pakistan image
An educational poster for distribution in Pakistan, depicting earthquake-safe construction techniques. Image via Dot Earth.

Growing up in California, I was never really scared of earthquakes — they happened frequently and most caused little, if any, damage. It wasn’t until I moved to Istanbul, where many of the buildings are illegally built or modified, that I became… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Bright Ideas in Earthquake-Safe, Ecofriendly Building
earthquake safe building methods poster pakistan image
An educational poster for distribution in Pakistan, depicting earthquake-safe construction techniques. Image via Dot Earth.

Growing up in California, I was never really scared of earthquakes — they happened frequently and most caused little, if any, damage. It wasn’t until I moved to Istanbul, where many of the buildings are illegally built or modified, that I became… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Bright Ideas in Earthquake-Safe, Ecofriendly Building
earthquake safe building methods poster pakistan image
An educational poster for distribution in Pakistan, depicting earthquake-safe construction techniques. Image via Dot Earth.

Growing up in California, I was never really scared of earthquakes — they happened frequently and most caused little, if any, damage. It wasn’t until I moved to Istanbul, where many of the buildings are illegally built or modified, that I became… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

U.S. seeks climate ideas after Copenhagen fell short
Document obtained by Reuters that lists U.S. questions to delegates from among the world’s top emitters suggests they may have to go back to the drawing board.
Visit the original post at: Green Tech

Organic Milk Production Trickles, Not Pours
baby-cows-photo.jpg
Photo via: karlfrankowski/Flickr

Just yesterday I joked seated at my neighborhood’s dive-y, not-concerned-about-clean-food diner that the likely hormone-injected milk I stirred into my coffee might spur the growth of a third boob. It was a risk I was willing to take on that particular morning when my eco-friendlier alternatives were lacking.

I’m not a huge dairy consumer but I do like it in coffee–and I do like knowing there is a rising organic dairy industry which, when the prices lev… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

NIST Launches 2010 TIP Competition; Focus on Materials and Process Advances for Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing

The US Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has launched a new competition for high-risk, high-reward research funding under the Technology Innovation Program (TIP). The new TIP competition offers cost-shared funding for innovative research on “Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances and Critical Processes.”

Approximately $25 million is available for first-year funding for an expected 25 new TIP projects. The goal of the effort is to inspire revolutionary materials advances leading to new products with advanced features and improved characteristics that will enter the market more quickly.

While new materials have the potential to open whole new markets for novel or dramatically improved manufactured products, a major challenge for manufacturers is efficiently moving new materials currently in the lab into production and the market, NIST says.

Materials performance is often a critical consideration and controlling factor in the innovation process. High strength alloys are used to build stronger, lighter and safer vehicles; superalloys are used to make higher efficiency gas turbines; composites make larger, more efficient wind turbine blades and provide improved performance in aerospace applications; and nanomaterials are finding their way into better performing batteries,

energy storage devices, electronic inks, high voltage transmission lines, and health care related applications (e.g. imaging and therapeutics). Ceramics have new uses in improving electronic and photonic devices, and glasses have many next-generation applications such as wireless communication, displays, optical telecommunication, integrated circuits, and ion exchange membranes for fuel cells.

—TIP White Paper

Improvements in critical manufacturing processes that reduce costs, save time, increase quality or reduce waste can dramatically improve the competitiveness of process-based industries, including biomanufacturing—the sector that produces vaccines and other biopharmaceuticals—chemical production and fuel producers, among others.

The 2010 TIP competition is open to research proposals in three areas:

  1. Process scale-up, integration, and design for materials advances. New materials typically are developed in a laboratory setting, and then samples are given to end-users for alpha and beta testing. During this testing phase, it can take considerable time and experimentation to understand how the materials can be incorporated into a new product in a way that maintains and utilizes its unique functionality. Scaling-up from laboratory quantities to larger volumes, validating properties, and then incorporating the materials into product manufacturing lines is often non-linear and does not follow straightforward scaling laws, due to the unique functionality that has been obtained from the materials advances.

  2. Predictive modeling for materials advances and materials processing.

    Predictive modeling capabilities are key to developing new processes, scaling-up these processes, and understanding how to utilize a materials advance’s unique functionality.

  3. Critical process advances. As the availability of new materials increases and the modeling of their behavior becomes more refined, there is a complementary need to improve processing or manufacturing methods. High-risk, high-reward approaches are needed to exploit the properties of the materials advances into new and more advanced products as well as support the processing of existing materials in new and different ways, resolving key bottlenecks or critical problems such as energy consumption, processing time, scrap rates, quality, and throughput.

    Current methods of manufacturing often are not rapidly adaptable to making new or different products, and are often not optimized towards making existing products faster, more cheaply, and more sustainably. Improving processes used in the manufacture of new and existing products is an imperative for the continued global competitiveness of US manufacturers. Creation of agile, flexible, and increasingly interoperable systems are necessary enhancements to base manufacturing technologies in order to meet new productivity challenges.

TIP promotes technological innovation by providing funding support to challenging, high-risk research projects that address critical national needs. The merit-based, competitive program can fund R&D projects by single small or medium-sized businesses or by joint ventures that also may include institutions of higher education, nonprofit research organizations and national laboratories. TIP awards are limited to no more than $3 million total over three years for a single company project and no more than $9 million total over five years for a joint venture.

In December 2009, NIST announced up to $71 million funding for 20 new research projects under TIP. Selected projects ranged from unmanned, hovering aircraft for inspecting bridges to a high-speed sorting system for recycling aerospace metals to nanomaterials for advanced batteries, including two projects specifically developing advanced electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. The cost-sharing awards represent up to $146 million in new research over the next two to five years. (Earlier post.)

The due date for submission of proposals is 11:59 p.m. Eastern time, 15 July 2010.

Resources


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