Archive for May 8th, 2010

Jobs In Solar: Sales Position (Tri-State-NY-NJ-CT)
Date: 2010-05-06, 1:33PM EDT
Reply to: job-tps6k-1727588661@craigslist.org

 Looking for salespeople for Solar/Renewable Energy sales. Work from home or office. Full training supplied. Must reply with resume.  

Location: Tri-State

  • Compensation: Minimum Base Salary + Agressive Commission Structure
  • Telecommuting is ok.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Jobs In Solar: Sales Position (Tri-State-NY-NJ-CT)
Date: 2010-05-06, 1:33PM EDT
Reply to: job-tps6k-1727588661@craigslist.org

 Looking for salespeople for Solar/Renewable Energy sales. Work from home or office. Full training supplied. Must reply with resume.  

Location: Tri-State

  • Compensation: Minimum Base Salary + Agressive Commission Structure
  • Telecommuting is ok.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

U.S. Navy Pumps More Money into High Efficiency Desalination Technology

US Navy awards NanoH2O $400,000 grant to develop high efficicency desalination nanomembraneThe U.S. Office of Naval Research has awarded a $400,000 grant to desalination tech leader NanoH2O, to develop a high efficiency desalination nanomembrane that is more resistant to fouling.  The effort, part of the Navy’s Future Naval Capabilities program, is aimed at increasing energy efficiency and portability for shipboard use. The NanoH2O grant also dovetails with the U.S. Navy’s focus on addressing climate change issues through its Task Force Climate Change program.

In contrast to climate science deniers like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other key organizations representing the interests of fossil fuel industries, the U.S. Department of Defense is moving aggressively to prepare for a future that is far more sustainable and energy efficient, and far less dependent on fossil fuels.  Hey, if those business “leaders” aren’t going to support our troops, they could at least get out of the way while everybody else is busy working.

(more…)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Year 2015 – Power Mall of India – Gujarat, India
Gujarat is going to be power surplus state within few years. Thanks to visionary policies and focused effort from government of Gujarat. A time for Power generation industries to invest and start project asap whether you are part of solar PV, Solar thermal, Wind, Bio-mass, Geo thermal or Ocean thermal technologies you are bringing.
Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com

Year 2015 – Power Mall of India – Gujarat, India
Gujarat is going to be power surplus state within few years. Thanks to visionary policies and focused effort from government of Gujarat. A time for Power generation industries to invest and start project asap whether you are part of solar PV, Solar thermal, Wind, Bio-mass, Geo thermal or Ocean thermal technologies you are bringing.
Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com

"Project Runway" Alum Leanne Marshall’s Wedding Dresses Will Make You Swoon (Photos)
leanne marshall wedding gown photo
“Helene” Wedding Dress by Leanne Marshall. Credit: Leanne Marshall

Designer Leanne Marshall, of Project Runway fame, has been using sustainable fabrics long before Tim Gunn ever had the chance to tell her: “Make it work.” Since debuting her designs at Bryant Park in September, 2008–and winning season… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Everblade green shaving discount

Everblade green shaving discount
HTML clipboardHere’s a new product the makers say can help save you money and reduce your
shaving related environmental impact. It’s called EverBlade – and Green
Living Tips Readers can get a 25% discount.


Visit the original post at: Green living tips

Everblade green shaving discount

Everblade green shaving discount
HTML clipboardHere’s a new product the makers say can help save you money and reduce your
shaving related environmental impact. It’s called EverBlade – and Green
Living Tips Readers can get a 25% discount.


Visit the original post at: Green living tips

The Gulf Coast Oil Spill & Your Health: Tips for Clean-Up Workers
dispersed oil breton island photo
Dispersed oil near Breton Island, Louisiana. Photo: NRDC via flickr.

This is a repost of an article written by Dr Gina Solomon from NRDC, originally appearing on Switchboard.

I continue today with Part 3 of my Q&A about oil spill health concerns with a look at tips for people helping out with the clean-up effort. You can find answers to basic background questions in my first Q&A post <a href=”http://switch… Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Researchers Develop Higher Performance Li-Ion Electrode Materials Using Ultracentrifugal Processing

Tech-On. Researchers at the Naoi Laboratory at the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology have used an in situ sol-gel process induced by ultra-centrifugal mechanical agitation to add an active material inside carbon for use as electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries to improve performance.

The ultracentrifugal processing technology was developed by K&W, a venture firm spun off from the university. The Naoi Lab earlier used the ultracentrifugal (>75000 N) technology to develop a Li-ion capacitor with a negative electrode made from CNFs and lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO).

Researchers used the technique to add lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) to hollow carbon and to carbon nanofibers—resulting in materials called the “ground cherry type” and “podded pea type” respectively.

In a discharge of 60C, the specific capacities of the ground cherry type and the podded pea type are 131 mAh/g and 113 mAh/g, respectively. The advantage of the ground cherry type is that it has a high performance at a high output and it can be made by using commercially-available carbon black. The podded pea type, on the other hand, has a high specific gravity, making it easy to enhance the energy density.

For an anode material, the researchers incorporated tin oxide (SnO2) in carbon. Tin oxide is a promising anode material offering increased capacity, but suffers from a short lifecycle due to volumetric changes during charge and discharge.

When a cell was made by using the negative-electrode material and a positive-electrode material using lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2), its specific capacity was 693 mAh/g after 800 cycles, showing no sign of capacity degradation, the university said.

“We found that the ultracentrifugal processing technology enables to add a variety of active materials inside carbon and enhance the performance,” said Kenji Tamamitsu, chief of the Functionality Materials Lab at the Basic Research Headquarters of Nippon Chemi-Con. “We would like to utilize it for battery materials in the future.”

Resources


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

Škoda Unveils new Greenline Fabia Combi GreenLine II and Roomster GreenLine II Models Featuring New 3-Cylinder, 1.2L Diesel; Stop-Start and Energy Recuperation

Following-on from the launch of the face-lifted Fabia and Roomster, Škoda Auto, a member of the Volkswagen Group, has unveiled the Fabia Estate GreenLine II and Roomster GreenLine II—the first of its second generation of more environmentally-friendly GreenLine models.

The new model Fabia and Roomster models have been facelifted and fitted with new technology designed to further reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emission levels. One of the major improvements is a new 1.2 TDI CR DPF/75bhp DPF diesel engine with Common Rail, start-stop technology, energy recuperation and gear recommendation (on a Maxi DOT display).

The second-generation GreenLine version with the three-cylinder supercharged diesel engine delivers fuel consumption of 3.4 L/100km (69 mpg US) and CO2 emissions of 89 g/km for the Fabia Estate GreenLine II, and 4.1 L/100km (56 mpg US) and 109 g/km for the Roomster GreenLine II.

The new engine complies with the EU 5 emission standard. The gear ratios of the car’s five-speed transmission are identical to those of the ordinary Fabia and Roomster models fitted with the same engine. As a result, the GreenLine II offers the same responsiveness but with lower consumption.

The stop-start system operates automatically, directly after the engine starts. If, after some time, the driver stops the vehicle, engages neutral and releases the clutch pedal, the engine switches off automatically. As soon as the driver presses the clutch, the engine starts again immediately.

Energy recuperation—capturing the vehicle’s kinetic energy for battery recharging—is another technology introduced on the new Fabia Estate i GreenLine II and Roomster GreenLine II. The two systems—Start-Stop and Braking energy recovery—work in partnership and. The application of the energy recovery system has helped to reduce the CO2 emissions by 2 – 4 g/km.

Other technologies Škoda is introducing on the Greenline II models to improve economy are the gear recommendation system, which helps the driver make optimum use of the engine’s potential, a lowered and aerodynamically-covered chassis and low rolling resistance tires.


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

More Insight Into Cobalt as Catalyst for Water Splitting

Researchers from UC Davis and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have uncovered more detail about the functioning of cobalt as a water-splitting catalyst. In 2008, MIT chemists, led by Professor Dan Nocera, reported that a simple cobalt catalyst could split water at neutral pH to produce oxygen, protons and electrons. The catalyst actually seems to assemble itself over several hours as an electric current is applied, and then begins to bubble oxygen. (Earlier post.)

This got a lot of attention from the chemistry community, but no one knew how it worked.

—R. David Britt, professor of chemistry at UC Davis

Britt’s lab is working with Nocera’s group to use a technique called electron paramagnetic resonance to study the chemical state of cobalt atoms in the catalyst. They found that as more water is split, the proportion of cobalt (IV) increases and the proportion of cobalt (II) decreases. The work opens the door to further studies on these catalysts, the authors write.

Ultimately, catalysts based on relatively abundant elements like cobalt, as opposed to platinum or gold, could make it economical to convert electricity from solar panels or other renewable sources into hydrogen fuel for storage or use. The protons and electrons produced from splitting water would be used in the next step of the process to make hydrogen.

Electron paramagnetic resonance is a technique similar to the nuclear magnetic resonance used in medical imaging. Britt’s lab uses it to study catalysts that split water, including both artificial catalysts and those used by plants in photosynthesis.

A paper describing the work was published online 30 April in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Resources

  • J. Gregory McAlpin, Yogesh Surendranath, Mircea Dinc, Troy A. Stich, Sebastian A. Stoian, William H. Casey, Daniel G. Nocera and R. David Britt (2010) EPR Evidence for Co(IV) Species Produced During Water Oxidation at Neutral pH. J. Am. Chem. Soc., Article ASAP

    doi: 10.1021/ja1013344


Visit the original post at: Transportation News

Petrobras Sets New Monthly Oil Production Record; Transpetro Launches First Promef Suezmax Tanker

Promef

Launch ceremony for the first Promef Suezmax tanker. Source: Petrobras. Click to enlarge.

Brazil’s Petrobras set a new monthly oil production record in April. The month’s average topped-out at 2,032,620 barrels per day, exceeding the previous monthly record, of 2,003,940 barrels per day, set in September 2009, by 29,000 barrels. This mark was 2.9% higher than a year ago and 1.9% more than March 2010.

Separately, Brazil president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva launched to sea the first oil tanker under the Transpetro Fleet Modernization and Expansion Program (Promef) at the Atlântico Sul Shipyard (EAS), in the port of Suape, state of Pernambuco. The Suezmax-type vessel is the first major vessel built in Brazil to be delivered to the Petrobras System in 13 years.

Oil production. In addition to the monthly record, Petrobras also set, on 23 and 24 April, two consecutive daily oil and LNG production records, reaching 2,081,570 and 2,082,543 barrels, respectively.

These results were the outcome, among other factors, of the good operational performance of the platforms located off the coast of Rio de Janeiro and Espírito Santo, with the spotlight on the interconnection of new wells to FPSO Cidade de Vitória, in the Golfinho Field (state of Espírito Santo); on new wells going into production in the Marlim Leste field, in the Campos Basin (state of Rio de Janeiro); and on the Extended Well Test (EWT) being started at Tiro, in the Santos Basin, on 19 March.

Onshore production also influenced these results, particularly with two new wells going into production in the fields of Rio Urucu (RUC) and Leste do Urucu (LUC), in Amazonas.

Although over 85% of the oil produced by the company in Brazil comes from offshore fields, Petrobras has achieved good results in its onshore areas. The average production of these fields has hovered around 215,000 barrels of oil per day, a volume that has been maintained over recent years due to new technologies the company has developed to enhance the useful life of mature fields.

With FPSOs Cidade de Santos coming into operation in upcoming months in Uruguá/Tambaú, and Capixaba, at Cachalote/Baleia Franca, respectively, the company expects to set new production records.

Transpetro Promef. President Lula’s determination that the construction of vessels and oil production platforms be resumed in Brazil was the foundation of the Promef, a program created in 2004 to revitalize the shipbuilding industry on globally competitive bases, based on the placement of orders for 49 vessels.

All of us have to take the construction of this ship seriously. It is the self-affirmation of a people which had long been forgotten.

—President Lula

The tanker is 274 meters long, has capacity for a million barrels of oil (half the daily domestic production), and will used mainly for long distance transport (international travel).

The construction of ten Suezmax vessels by the Atlântico Sul Shipyard (EAS)—created to compete for Transpetro orders—was the first work under the Government’s Growth Acceleration Program (GAP) to have the contract signed for it, back in January 2007. The second Promef launch is planned for June, at the Mauá Shipyard (state of Rio de Janeiro).

EAS is the largest and most modern shipyard in Brazil. It will assemble 22 Promef vessels, and, thus, holds the program’s largest portfolio. There will be 10 Suezmax-type vessels (160,000 deadweight tons (DWT), capable of delivering a million barrels of oil each); five Aframax (110,000 DWT); four Suezmax DP shuttle vessels (with dynamic positioning); and three Aframax DP shuttle vessels.

Later in the year, two Suezmax vessels will be launched at the EAS, and two product ships will set sail at the Mauá Shipyard—the first of which next June, in Niterói. This will complete the four Promef launches planned for 2010.


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US DOE Awarding Up To $62M for Concentrating Solar Power Research and Development

The US Department of Energy has selected 13 projects for investment of up to $62 million over five years to research, develop, and demonstrate Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems capable of providing low-cost electrical power.

CSP technologies concentrate the sun’s energy and capture that energy as heat, which then drives an engine or turbine to produce electrical power. CSP plants can include low-cost energy storage, allowing them to provide electricity even when the sun is not shining.

The selected projects will seek to improve component and system designs to extend operation to an average of about 18 hours per day, a level of production that would make it possible for these plants to displace traditional coal-burning power plants. The thirteen award selections announced today fall into two areas:

Concentrating Solar Power Systems Studies. Projects awarded under this category will evaluate the feasibility of a complete CSP baseload system and support development of prototype systems for field testing. These selections include:

  • Abengoa Solar, Inc. – Lakewood, CO – up to $10.6 million. Abengoa Solar will develop a new power tower technology that captures heat in a high-temperature receiver at the top of an elevated tower. The system will focus the sun’s rays to the tower using a 360-degree, surround reflector field on the ground and collect the heat in a salt fluid, which is used to make steam and drive a turbine. The system will also incorporate a thermal storage system to allow it to operate for a period when the sun isn’t shining. The ability to operate at higher temperatures will translate into more energy produced with the same size power plant. Abengoa is currently the only company with a full-scale, operational power tower, and thus proving this technology could help it reach commercial maturity.

  • eSolar, Inc. – Pasadena, CA – up to $10.8 million. eSolar will design, build, and test a CSP power plant system with fundamentally new components. Instead of one central tower and receiver, the plant will employ multiple, modular towers. Using reflective mirrors, the sun’s radiation will heat a liquid salt within each receiver. A specialized molten salt transport system will then move the high-temperature fluid to a molten-salt steam generator that produces electricity. The system will also feature a thermal storage system. Eventually, this technology could deliver lower-cost solar energy at a utility scale.

  • Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne – Canoga Park, CA – up to $10.2 million. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne will build on and advance the current solar power tower plant design. The project will explore new materials for the central power tower receiver. A novel thermal storage system will be developed and used, representing the first time such technology has been integrated into a CSP plant design. A more efficient power cycle will help produce more electricity. These improvements will all be made in the hopes of driving down the cost of solar energy.

Concentrating Solar Power Component Feasibility Studies. Awards under this category focus on research and development of concepts and components that could be part of a CSP baseload system. These selections include:

  • General Atomics – San Diego, CA – up to $2.1 million. General Atomics will carry out feasibility and design studies to validate the concept of supplying reliable, steady baseload power using a concentrating solar power plant integrated with sulfur-based energy storage. The energy is stored through a chemical reaction, which potentially allows the energy to be stored for a much longer period of time. The ability to store the heat captured by a CSP system during the day and continue running the power plant at night or when it’s cloudy makes solar power plants more reliable.

  • HiTek Services, Inc. – Owens Cross Roads, AL – up to $3.0 million. HiTek Services will focus on optimizing reflector array, or heliostat, designs in order to reduce the cost of using heliostats in a solar field. All CSP systems use reflectors to collect and focus the sun’s rays to heat a receiving material, and heliostats represent the most expensive component of a CSP system. By driving down the cost of reflector arrays, this project could significantly lower the up-front cost of CSP power plants.

  • Infinia Corporation – Kennewick, WA – up to $3.0 million. Infinia Corporation is developing a large-scale thermal energy storage solution that can be used with solar dishes. The system will be essentially maintenance-free and will allow large amounts of energy to be stored in a cost-effective and efficient manner. There is currently no commercial storage mechanism that is compatible with CSP solar dishes, and thus this storage technology could be a breakthrough for the CSP solar dish industry.

  • PPG Industries, Inc. – Cheswick, PA – up to $3.0 million. PPG Industries will develop a next-generation, low-cost reflector with increased reflectivity, increased durability, and larger dimensions. Increasing the performance of reflectors while pushing down the cost of materials and manufacturing will serve as an enabling technology for utility-scale CSP power plants. The most significant maintenance cost of a CSP plant is cleaning and replacing the mirrors, and thus this new reflector design could have a significant impact on total plant cost.

  • SENER Engineering and Systems Inc. – San Francisco, CA – up to $3.1 million. SENER is developing a high-efficiency thermal storage system for solar plants with technology that can extend the operating range of thermal storage using solid, modular blocks. Higher temperature storage has a direct impact upon the amount of energy that can be extracted and converted into electricity, and is an essential component for CSP plants to become competitive with coal-burning plants.

  • SkyFuel, Inc. – Albuquerque, NM – up to $4.3 million. SkyFuel will develop a low-cost CSP trough system with significantly larger dimensions than today’s troughs for use in baseload concentrating solar power generation. Increasing the operating temperature and output of CSP power plants that use a trough-shaped reflector to heat a receiving fluid will help make CSP a viable technology for baseload power.

  • SunTrough Energy, Inc. – Chatsworth, CA – up to $4.5 million. SunTrough Energy will develop a new class of solar concentrators and build a pilot manufacturing facility to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the new technology. The design will place an emphasis on lightweight materials and mass-manufacturability. A focus on manufacturing will lead to smaller and fewer parts, simpler assembly procedures, and more rapid field installation, all of which will drive the total cost of a CSP facility down.

  • Terrafore, Inc. – Riverside, CA – up to $1.4 million. Terrafore is developing an efficient and economical thermal storage system for baseload power generation that takes advantage of the energy that is transferred when materials melt and solidify. One of the primary challenges for solar energy is dealing with the issue of intermittency; in other words, how to supply reliable power when the sun is not shining. Therefore, optimizing the design of CSP systems to store the heat for later use could help build confidence in the widespread adoption of solar energy.

  • University of South Florida – Tampa, FL – up to $2.5 million. The University of South Florida will develop and demonstrate an innovative thermal energy storage system based on materials that absorb heat when changing from a solid to a liquid and release heat when changing from a liquid to a solid. Integrating thermal energy storage into CSP plants makes CSP a reliable source of baseload electricity.

  • Wilson TurboPower, Inc. – Woburn, MA – up to $3.7 million. Wilson TurboPower is utilizing a small transportable turbine power system in a modular CSP solar power tower configuration. By building a more compact CSP power block, the power block can be assembled in-factory and shipped to the worksite. The power block design also incorporates an advanced cooling method that reduces water usage. This novel design will operate at high temperatures and allow for super-efficient operation.


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