Archive for May 18th, 2010

NREL & Samsung Obtain Decades of Wind Power Data in Two Months of Testing

wind turbine drive in a factoryIn a coupling of giants recently, the 2.5-megawatt dynamometer at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory blasted 12.6 million inch pounds of torque at Samsung’s 185,000-pound wind turbine drive train.

The King Kong of wind turbines battled the Godzilla of dynamometers to a draw.

It was the greatest amount of power ever measured at NREL’s dynamometer lab, and the largest full-scale dynamometer test of a wind turbine drive train ever done in the United States.

Samsung officials wanted to learn how well their 250-foot-high wind turbines would survive 25 years of gales, gusts, rain, rust, cyclones and dust.

They turned to NREL because its dynamometer can simulate worst-case wind conditions 24 hours a day. In a few months of testing, a manufacturer can learn whether its gear boxes, bearings and cog wheels will stand up to real-world conditions.

NREL’s 2.5-megawatt dynamometer is outfitted with a powerful 3,550-horsepower electric motor coupled to a three-stage epicyclic gearbox. The motor can produce speeds up to 30 revolutions per minute, simulating everything from soft breezes to backbreaking gales.

Decades of Data in Two Months of Testing

“If we tried to get this information out in the field, it would take years to acquire this kind of data,” Ed Overly, master research technician and dynamometer gatekeeper at NREL’s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), said. “We run the turbine under test conditions for 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 2.1 megawatts. We can monitor how all the fluid and bearing temperatures equilibrate at their maximum points. We see how well the inverter operates under different load conditions to detect if there are any unknown faults.”

“Doing this test with Samsung has given us the experience of testing a very large machine at the Dynamometer Facility, which we’ve never done before,” Overly said.

Samsung already has a similar sized (2.5-megawatt) wind turbine running in Lubbock, Texas, that can provide electricity for 1,800 homes, said In-kyu Kim, manager of the Wind Turbine Development team at Samsung. But the company had never tested one of its turbines above 600 kilowatts.

Jaedoo Lee, manager at Samsung Heavy Industries, said his company chose NREL “because we needed to test for performance and we know NREL is prestigious. We like to simulate and test all the tough and extreme conditions that would happen in the real world.”

“We wanted a third-party test for quality,” Lee added. “NREL is the perfect test facility for us. We’d like to keep working with them as we develop wind turbines for off-shore uses.”

Moving 185,000 Pounds: A Herculean Endeavor

wind turbine drive in a factoryHow did the huge wind turbine drive-train make its way into the dynamometer’s test bay?

“It was a monumental task,” Overly said. “We had to move 200,000 pounds of equipment out of here and clean up the whole high bay, then move in the Samsung turbine – within a week.”

A 185-foot-long, 19-axle rig hauled the drive train and electrical equipment from Houston to the NWTC. Then a 400-ton crane moved the drive train onto a track and cart system, temporarily laid just for the move. “We off-loaded it and brought it into the dynamometer in one piece,” Overly said. It’s the largest piece of equipment ever installed in the Dynamometer Test Facility.

The software used by NREL and Samsung tells the dynamometer what kind of torque it should give the drive train.

“We want to provide an accurate reproduction of loads the drive train will see in the field,” NREL senior engineer Robb Wallen said as the dynamometer put the Samsung drive train though its paces last month. “The tower, rotor and blades are represented by computer models which interact in real-time with the drive train and turbine control system just like their real counterparts.”

Using a virtual wind-speed profile the computer model calculates what the main shaft torque should be and sends the torque commands to the dynamometer. “The end result is the drive train responding to a variety of wind conditions as it would in the field,” Wallen said. It’s a very sophisticated test and it’s never been done here before.”

The tests, which ran for a couple months early this year, “accelerate the startup, the actual checkout, as well as spotting any kinds of deficiencies,” Overly said.

NREL is the only place in the nation where “you can run a wind turbine under load conditions, watch it operate real-time, be standing near to it and hear how it operates,” Overly said. “You can’t accomplish that up in a wind turbine in the field.”

Meanwhile, NREL is taking the next giant step – designing a 5-megawatt dynamometer that will be capable of testing most of the large turbines expected to roll off humungous assembly lines in the next decade.

www.nrel.gov

May 17, 2010

Photo  of Samsung's 90-ton drive train connected to NREL's 2.5-megawatt  dynamometer in a high-ceiling metal building. The drive train is a  cylindrical shape, but several attachments give it the look of a giant  Lego contraption. Enlarge image

A coupling of giants: Samsung’s 2.5-megawatt wind turbine drive train meets the National Wind Technology Center’s 2.5-megawatt dynamometer. Samsung’s drive train weighs 90 tons and is the brains behind its 2.5-megawatt wind turbine that can supply electricity to 1,800 homes.
Credit: Rob Wallen

In a coupling of giants recently, the 2.5-megawatt dynamometer at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory blasted 12.6 million inch pounds of torque at Samsung’s 185,000-pound wind turbine drive train.

The King Kong of wind turbines battled the Godzilla of dynamometers to a draw.

It was the greatest amount of power ever measured at NREL’s dynamometer lab, and the largest full-scale dynamometer test of a wind turbine drive train ever done in the United States.

Samsung officials wanted to learn how well their 250-foot-high wind turbines would survive 25 years of gales, gusts, rain, rust, cyclones and dust.

They turned to NREL because its dynamometer can simulate worst-case wind conditions 24 hours a day. In a few months of testing, a manufacturer can learn whether its gear boxes, bearings and cog wheels will stand up to real-world conditions.

NREL’s 2.5-megawatt dynamometer is outfitted with a powerful 3,550-horsepower electric motor coupled to a three-stage epicyclic gearbox. The motor can produce speeds up to 30 revolutions per minute, simulating everything from soft breezes to backbreaking gales.

Decades of Data in Two Months of Testing

This  photo shows NREL master technician Ed Overly with three Samsung  engineers observing the test of a gigantic wind turbine drive train by  the National Wind Technology Center's 2.5-megawatt dynamometer. Enlarge image

Jaedoo Lee, Samsung Heavy Industries projects manager, supervises testing activities at the National Wind Technology Center’s 2.5-megawatt dynamometer facility. The test of Samsung’s 2.5 megawatt drive train was the largest such test ever in the United States. Behind Lee is NREL master technician Ed Overly, Samsung engineer Hye-jung Jung and Samsung controls engineer In-chul Ha.
Credit: Bill Scanlon

“If we tried to get this information out in the field, it would take years to acquire this kind of data,” Ed Overly, master research technician and dynamometer gatekeeper at NREL’s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), said. “We run the turbine under test conditions for 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 2.1 megawatts. We can monitor how all the fluid and bearing temperatures equilibrate at their maximum points. We see how well the inverter operates under different load conditions to detect if there are any unknown faults.”

“Doing this test with Samsung has given us the experience of testing a very large machine at the Dynamometer Facility, which we’ve never done before,” Overly said.

Samsung already has a similar sized (2.5-megawatt) wind turbine running in Lubbock, Texas, that can provide electricity for 1,800 homes, said In-kyu Kim, manager of the Wind Turbine Development team at Samsung. But the company had never tested one of its turbines above 600 kilowatts.

Jaedoo Lee, manager at Samsung Heavy Industries, said his company chose NREL “because we needed to test for performance and we know NREL is prestigious. We like to simulate and test all the tough and extreme conditions that would happen in the real world.”

“We wanted a third-party test for quality,” Lee added. “NREL is the perfect test facility for us. We’d like to keep working with them as we develop wind turbines for off-shore uses.”

Moving 185,000 Pounds: A Herculean Endeavor

This  photo shows the enormous blue and white cylindrical drive train of  Samsung's wind turbine being unloaded by a crane from an extra-long  semi-trailer outside the dynamometer test facility. Enlarge image

NREL technicians Bill Gage and Norm Hill help unload the 90-ton Samsun drive-train after it made the trip on semi-trailers from Houston to NREL’s National Wind Technology Center.
Credit: Rob Wallen

How did the huge wind turbine drive-train make its way into the dynamometer’s test bay?

“It was a monumental task,” Overly said. “We had to move 200,000 pounds of equipment out of here and clean up the whole high bay, then move in the Samsung turbine – within a week.”

A 185-foot-long, 19-axle rig hauled the drive train and electrical equipment from Houston to the NWTC. Then a 400-ton crane moved the drive train onto a track and cart system, temporarily laid just for the move. “We off-loaded it and brought it into the dynamometer in one piece,” Overly said. It’s the largest piece of equipment ever installed in the Dynamometer Test Facility.

The software used by NREL and Samsung tells the dynamometer what kind of torque it should give the drive train.

“We want to provide an accurate reproduction of loads the drive train will see in the field,” NREL senior engineer Robb Wallen said as the dynamometer put the Samsung drive train though its paces last month. “The tower, rotor and blades are represented by computer models which interact in real-time with the drive train and turbine control system just like their real counterparts.”

Using a virtual wind-speed profile the computer model calculates what the main shaft torque should be and sends the torque commands to the dynamometer. “The end result is the drive train responding to a variety of wind conditions as it would in the field,” Wallen said. It’s a very sophisticated test and it’s never been done here before.”

The tests, which ran for a couple months early this year, “accelerate the startup, the actual checkout, as well as spotting any kinds of deficiencies,” Overly said.

NREL is the only place in the nation where “you can run a wind turbine under load conditions, watch it operate real-time, be standing near to it and hear how it operates,” Overly said. “You can’t accomplish that up in a wind turbine in the field.”

Meanwhile, NREL is taking the next giant step – designing a 5-megawatt dynamometer that will be capable of testing most of the large turbines expected to roll off humungous assembly lines in the next decade.

Learn more about wind research at NREL.


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Nordic Windpower raises $38 million

Nordic Windpower raises $38 million

Nordic Windpower recently announced that it has raised $38 million in a new financing round led by Khosla Ventures, a premier investor in clean technology companies. Joining Khosla Ventures in the Series C equity financing are New Enterprise Associates (NEA), one of the largest venture firms worldwide, Novus Energy Partners, a US/Europe-based investor in clean technology, and existing investor Impax Asset Management, a London-based fund. Other participants include I2BF Management, an international cleantech focused investment management group, and Pulsar Energy Capital. The company has previously closed three funding rounds since 2007 from investors including Goldman Sachs International, Impax Asset Management and NBT AS.
“This investment represents a significant achievement for Nordic Windpower,” said Patricia Bellinger, Chairman of the Board of Nordic Windpower. “We are committed to greatly expanding access to our high quality, innovative two-bladed wind turbines to communities across America and beyond. The support of this world class group of investors led by Khosla Ventures will enable us to build and grow Nordic Windpower substantially, while contributing to global efforts to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and President Obama’s goal of energy independence.”
Through the sale of new shares, $30.1 million has been raised with the balance arising from the conversion of notes issued in 2009. Nordic Windpower will use the funds, of which $12.1 million has already been received, to scale up its business activities involving the sale, manufacturing and service of its innovative 1 MW, N1000 wind turbines. Last month, the company announced the shipment to Uruguay’s largest wind power developer of the first three of 19 turbines sold since May 2009. The remaining turbines on order are destined for projects in the US including schools, a municipal utility, a US Army base and wind farms, with deliveries commencing in January 2010. Several more projects are coming into the Nordic Windpower manufacturing pipeline during early 2010.
“We are building a company that aspires to become the trusted leader in community and distributed utility wind turbines,” said Tom Carbone, CEO of Nordic Windpower. “Our customers will soon realize the many environmental and cost benefits of these wonderful, affordable and reliable wind turbines. As the first and only wind power company to receive a commitment from the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Loan Guarantee Program, Nordic Windpower is now in a position to meet its equity requirement, which combined with the Series C corporate funding, will further strengthen our growth plans.”
“Khosla Ventures and its investment partners are focused on innovative clean technology. We’re passionate about disruptive large technology innovations and Nordic Windpower’s proprietary technology, market focus and company performance are a great match for us,” said Jim Kim, Partner at Khosla Ventures. “Nordic has already established itself among the most innovative wind turbine manufacturers in the world, and we are excited to be involved in the company’s growth.”


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Yosemite to Hold Largest Solar Array in National Park System

Yosemite National Park stretches across the western Sierra Nevada mountains in eastern California. The wild and majestic home of imposing rock cliffs, Giant Sequoias and mammoth waterfalls, among other attractions, plans to add a more modern natural wonder this fall: solar power.

yosemite falls solar

Yosemite is spending $4.4 million of Recovery Act funding to install solar panels on new shade structures and existing buildings at the El Portal administration center, according to the Merced Sun-Star. Upon completion it will be the largest solar power installation in a national park in the United States.

The system will produce approximately 800,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of solar power annually. That’s enough to save the park 12 percent on its energy bills each year and, using 13 cents per kWh as a benchmark, save the park roughly $104,000 as well.

There are a total of 58 solar installations in the Pacific West Region of the National Park Service. The soon-to-be Yosemite installation will double the amount of solar electricity produced in that region all by itself.

Other notable solar installations at National Parks include the Visitor Center at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.

Photo Credit: MW


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

300 New Green Jobs Headed for Southern Nevada
Those of you interested in getting jobs and positions in the eco-industries need to get yourselves trained and educated. This field is growing and will continue to grow in the coming years. What’s needed is well trained mature responsible professionals to fill these jobs.

Amonix, a designer and manufacturer of concentrated photovoltaic solar systems is building a manufacturing plant in Southern Nevada. The factory expected to be finished by the end of this year will employ almost 300 people, 278 to be exact.

They’ll be looking for managers, technicians and people to do production in their new facility.

Here are a few companies that provide training for people who want to get into the solar power, wind, alternative energy fields:

* Boots On The Roof

* Allied Schools

* Solar Energy International

* Solar Classes Online

* Training for Solar

* American Solar Energy Society

Here’s a helpful article: “How to Land a Job in The Solar Industry” by Isabelle Christensen.

Also check out your local community educational programs, community colleges, solar installation companies for training information.

If you’re a plumber or an electrician you’ve already got the basic training you need and just need specialized technical training for solar related careers. Installers of photovoltaic panels and solar thermal water heaters are always going to be needed and in demand right now.

More details on Amonix building their new factory at KTNV.com .


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Jobs In Solar: Head – Solar Installation Division – Oregon (Portland)
Date: 2010-05-17, 11:50AM PDT
Reply to: job-6gzqf-1745535575@craigslist.org

Head – Solar Installation Division – Oregon

Litesolar, the well-funded subsidiary of International Finance, a long time Orange County / Los Angeles County, CA real estate development/energy company is looking for an experienced solar installation executive to open and run its commercial solar system integration Office in Portland. The position reports to the CEO and will assist in the development and implementation of a plan of action to continue expanding the office. Litesolar offices are located in Southern Ca, Louisiana, Hawaii, Colorado, and soon in Oregon, New Jersey, and North Carolina.

Duties

1. Develop systems, process and tools that maintain high performing teams that produce efficient and consistent installation services.
2. Experienced in identifying, specifying and integrating technology into efficient service delivery.
3. Proven record of attracting and recruiting high functioning teams.
4. Able to thrive in a culture of innovation, and high productivity.
5. Supervise the installation of solar panels and systems for multifamily and commercial projects.
6. Create installation procedures based on industry practice.
7. Prepare installation budgets on a project-by-project basis.
8. Assist in developing and customizing proposals to various clients.

Minimum Requirements:

1. Construction and or electrical engineering degree or contracting license preferred.
2. Minimum seven years experience with commercial, electrical construction; 2 years of solar installation experience on commercial projects preferred.
3. Must have solar installation certifications or extensive commercial electrical construction.
4. Previous experience directing a solar installation department is a plus.

Additional

Compensation is commensurate with experience. To apply submit your resume via Email to jobs@litesolar.com.

Location: Portland

  • Compensation: Compensation is commensurate with experience, position is bonus eligible.
  • Principals only. Recruiters, please don’t contact this job poster.
  • Please, no phone calls about this job!
  • Please do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests.



Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

ACTA Acting Up to Bring Hydrogen Technology to Market

A company called ACTA is acting out, but in a good way and will not be sent to its room for a timeout. What ACTA is doing is pulling out all stops in regard to bringing hydrogen power products to market.

In a recent announcement, ACTA said it will be using micro wind turbines and water to bring hydrogen generators inside one’s residence for home use, “The combined system is being developed for use in homes that are not connected to the electricity grid and for remote renewable energy storage applications. It will also act as a demonstrator for larger-scale peak energy shaving applications.

“Energy generated from a wind turbine will be used to produce hydrogen from water using Acta’s unique electrolysis technology. The pure, dry, compressed hydrogen can be stored and then used, on demand, to produce electricity through a mid-sized fuel cell. The Company believes that future applications will include distributed power microgeneration and storage, and ultimately that the system can be scaled up to utility-sized installations for use with commercial wind farms.” Also, these units could be used for home hydrogen fueling stations as well.”

But, putting a hydrogen generator the size of a refrigerator is not the only thing ACTA is acting upon. I’ve talked before about the ACTA hydrogen bike, the ACTA hydrogen fuel cell for outboard motorboats and ACTA hydrogen fuel injection systems for increasing gas mileage and reducing emissions.

The combined heat and power (CHP) system from ACTA is just their latest product offering in the field of hydrogen fuel and alternative energy. As ACTA brings more and diverse hydrogen energy products to market one will soon notice that they are becoming a major player within this market space. Unlike some emerging technology companies that start hot and fade away quickly, ACTA is beginning to see a profit from their line of hydrogen products.

ACTA is acting like a major player already, filling niches in the marketplace that other companies are failing to act upon. It is the pioneers of today who will be the mainstream businesses of the new energy tomorrow. And that day will come shortly.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

THAT’S HOT – Online Advertising

THAT’S HOT – Online Advertising


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Why AB32 Goes After the Cement Industry


While a Wyoming coal plant and one Chevron refinery are the largest pollution sources for California, the three industries that together account for 40% of California’s GHG emissions include electric utilities, oil refineries and cement manufacturers – so these are the three industries most impacted by California’s climate legislation, AB32, which will begin next year.

California is the largest cement-producing state in the U.S., accounting for between 10% and 15% of U.S. cement production and cement industry employment with about 2,000 workers between 31 cement facilities.

The fossil energy that it takes to heat the cement mix up to 2,642 degrees Fahrenheit is why cement production has such high carbon dioxide emissions. (more…)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

MIT Designs Fuel-Efficient Airplanes Designed to Emit Less NOx for NASA
A team of engineers from MIT have designed fuel-efficient aircraft that are expected to reduce the emission of nitrogen oxides and unlike conventional models, to consume 70 percent less fuel.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Panasonic Revives The Stirling Engine For 10 kW Waste Heat Recovery System
estir Co., an in-company venture of Panasonic led by Teruyuki Akazawa, thought that it would make a good business reusing the otherwise wasted heat from Panasonic’s plants, and reimplemented Stirling engines, seeking to make them more efficient than ever.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

CleanTechies Boosts Job Seekers’ Confidence to Pursue Careers in CleanTech
CleanTechies.com, a leading global career services forum providing insight, orientation, and opportunities for the CleanTech community, has launched professional resume writing services to meet the increasing demand for guidance and orientation in the growing CleanTech and Renewable Energy market. CleanTechies’ new offering focuses on helping job seekers identify and leverage their most relevant skills and experiences. With expertly written resumes and cover letters that highlight their strengths, job seekers have the confidence to successfully pursue careers in this new economy. The new service can be found at: http://cleantechies.com/professional-resume-writing-services/
Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com

How to Write a Resume to Change Career?

Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com

E.ON Launches Pelamis-Built Marine Hydropower Device in UK
The UK subsidiary of German utility E.ON AG has unveiled its first wave energy hydropower device in the UK. United Kingdom-based marine hydropower developer Pelamis Wave Power Ltd. developed and constructed the device, which will be tested at the European Marine Energy Centre.
Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com

BlueChip Energy Appoints Carlos M. Gonzalez as Regional Director of Business Development
BlueChip Energy™, a provider of complete solar energy solutions for residential, commercial, and utility applications, today announced that Carlos M. Gonzalez has been appointed as regional director of business development. He will oversee the company’s strategy for large commercial, industrial and utility projects in Central Florida as well as the development of solar farms.
Visit the original post at: Renewable Energy News – RenewableEnergyWorld.com