Archive for July 7th, 2010

Decision tree helps select math optimizer

The Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG) Library uses a decision tree in software to select optimization routines for engineering tasks. The software’s step-by-step instructions help researchers, for example,  solve turbine design problems or find new photovoltaic materials. Many software devices use these routines as building blocks of their applications. They rely on the knowledge base in the software to “future-proof” their application-development investments. The decision tree feature is especially helpful for new and experienced users, because they can select an appropriate routine in a matter of minutes.

The decision trees lead the user through simple yes/no questions that categorize the problem and suggests the most suitable routines to use. This one included in the chapter on Partial Differential Equations.

NAG principal technical consultant David Sayers, says selecting optimization algorithms can be complex. “For maximum efficiency, different algorithms should be used for a different problem types,” he says. “Often these are characterized by the type of objective function – looking for a minimized or maximized value – and by the types of constraints applied.” He explains that objective functions might be linear, quadratic (positive-definite or indefinite), or nonlinear. They may have a special form such as a sum of squares, be sparse, dense, smooth, or discontinuous. “Combine these with constraint options — none, simple bound, linear, or genuine nonlinear — and you see that a comprehensive chapter of optimization routines can be very large. Therefore, decision trees are invaluable to the user to choosing the right routine.”

NAG, a UK-based, non-profit numerical software developer, works to advance methods for solving optimization problems and similar computational challenges. The company’s decision trees are part of tested and documented sets of optimization routines, as well as other mathematical and statistical algorithms in the library. Researchers can use the software in environments such as C++, Fortran, MATLAB, and R.

Numerical Algorithms Group

Nag.com


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Yingli Green Energy Announces Initial Production of 400 MW Capacity Expansions
 BAODING, Hebei and HAIKOU, Hainan, China, July 7 /PRNewswire-Asia- FirstCall/ — Yingli Green Energy Holding Company Limited (NYSE:  YGE) (“Yingli Green Energy” or the “Company”), a leading solar energy company and one of the world’s largest vertically integrated photovoltaic manufacturers, which holds the brand “Yingli Solar,” today announced the initial production of its latest 400 MW capacity expansions. The new solar PV manufacturing lines include a 300 MW PANDA monocrystalline silicon based production capacity at the Company’s Baoding headquarters, and a 100 MW multicrystalline silicon based production capacity in Haikou, Hainan Province.

“We are excited about the initial production of our newly added 400 MW manufacturing lines. These significant milestones were achieved within one year, demonstrating our accumulated expertise in capacity expansion,” commented Mr. Liansheng Miao, Chairman and CEO of Yingli Green Energy. “We expect these latest production lines to reach full capacity by the end of this quarter, which will bring our total nameplate capacity to 1 GW. Our success can be attributed to the strong demand for our high performance products, especially our recently introduced Yingli Solar Panda Module(TM). The expected output of these new lines this year has been fully booked by our customers. We believe our expanded product portfolio and increased capacity will further solidify our industry leadership worldwide.”

“Given the higher cell efficiency of the Yingli Solar Panda Module(TM), we expect to help our customers further reduce their balance-of-system cost. We also plan to continue to invest in high efficiency cell research and development in order to deliver the best technology and products possible to all of our customers with a focus on the reduction of the total cost of KW hour generation,” Mr. Miao concluded.



Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Florida’s Dead Rebate Program Rolling Over in its Grave

Florida’s once-lucrative solar rebates are done. No more. Finito. Due to a cumbersome budget deficit, the state legislature allowed the $4-per-watt rebate for solar power systems to expire on June 30th. It’s sad. Everybody regrets it. florida sunshine state signNobody wished for it. But can we not roll with the changes? Can’t the Sunshine State just move along to greener (if not so sunny) pastures?

Well, no, says the IRS. And NO! says a group of Floridians who installed solar systems while the rebate was still alive but are still waiting for their check.

The situation in Florida is rather odd. On the one hand, we have the auditor, the IRS, which in a recent letter slammed the state for misspending Recovery Act dollars on the ailing solar rebate program — to the tune of $8.3 million. On the other are a group of homeowners who were approved for state rebates, paid for their solar systems up-front, and have yet to receive a dime.

According to the NBC2 News in Port Charlotte, the state still owes $40 million in rebate checks to solar homeowners, but has no apparent state financing to pay it. Meanwhile, Florida still has $112 million in federal stimulus funding, but according to the IRS, cannot use it.

To clarify, the IRS is alleging that Florida used the $8 million-plus stimulus dollars to pay for rebates that were approved before the Recovery Act was even passed. The state of Florida says the feds should not be surprised, as they gave the state permission to use the money in that way upon delivery. The IRS says that stimulus funds are intended to create new or save existing green jobs, and paying homeowners rebates for projects that are complete and thus hold no new job prospects in no way conforms to those intentions.

And while Big and Little Brother squabble, $40 million worth of solar systems and their owners are caught in the middle, many roiling in solar-disenfranchisement. You would hope that the solar homeowners in question, who themselves may have gone up to $30,000 or more into debt to finance their systems, will eventually be paid what their state promised. florida solar rebatesThe question is when? Monthly energy savings are great, and I imagine most are happily enjoying significantly lower utility bills, but a decent return on investment for home solar power is still largely dependent upon rebates and incentives.

While it may not help the rebate-hungry homeowners, perhaps Florida could use some of that $112 million in stimulus funds, which it must spend by April 2012, to launch a new rebate program that would create new jobs and advance solar power in one of America’s sunniest states. It certainly would not purport to be as lucrative as its predecessor, but anything is better than nothing (solar costs are dropping anyhow), and Florida solar installers are already contemplating moves to more solar-friendly, less IRS-ire-inducing states like Georgia and South Carolina.

Source: NBC-2.com
Photo Credit: Florida.uk


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Calisolar Appoints John D. Correnti as Chairman of the Board, Terry Jester as Executive Vice President of Operations
SUNNYVALE, CA–(Marketwire – July 7, 2010) -  Calisolar, a vertically integrated manufacturer of solar silicon, wafers and cells, today announced it has appointed John D. Correnti Chairman of the Board of Directors and named Terry Jester as Executive Vice President of Operations. The new additions will support the company’s rapid scale-up of solar wafer and cell processing operations in Sunnyvale, California and silicon purification operations in Vaughan, Ontario.

“Response to our product has been phenomenal, and we are now in the process of ramping up production to meet increasing demand,” said Calisolar CEO Roy Johnson. “To do this, we have added leaders with deep and successful manufacturing experience. Throughout his career in the steel manufacturing business, John Correnti has worked with companies of every size, and he revolutionized the steel industry with the mini-mill approach that allowed the cost-effective use of lower-cost inputs to make a high-quality output. That experience, along with his relationships in the investment community, will directly benefit Calisolar. With 30 years of solar industry manufacturing experience, Terry Jester is the best person possible to lead our expanded manufacturing operations.”

John D. Correnti, the first outside director to join the company, is currently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Steel Development Company LLC. He has nearly 40 years of operations, management, and board experience in the steel industry, serving at both large and small companies. He pioneered the re-birth of the U.S. steel industry through the introduction of mini-mills that produce low-cost, high-quality steel as President and CEO of Nucor Corporation, CEO of Birmingham Steel, and Founder, President and CEO of SeverCorr. He brings a wealth of relevant experience to the rapidly growing Calisolar, including founding SeverCorr in 2003 and directing its rapid growth to more than $1 billion in annual revenues in just five years.

Ms. Jester has extensive experience in manufacturing and engineering and led efforts to ramp up manufacturing operations to full production for a variety of technologies including silicon-based solar photovoltaics. Ms. Jester has managed large solar operations and held positions at SunPower, SolarWorld, Siemens, Arco and Shell. She holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering from California State University Northridge.

“Calisolar continues to build a world-class management team as it matures into a full-scale manufacturing company,” said Daniel Gross, a Founding Partner at Hudson Clean Energy Partners and Director of Calisolar. “The market demand for cost-effective solar technology has never been greater and we believe that Calisolar’s high-performance solar cells and low-cost silicon will dramatically change the economics of the solar industry. The company’s ability to attract such experienced and proven talent as John Correnti and Terry Jester is further validation of the company’s unique and very attractive position in the global solar industry.” Earlier this year, Calisolar acquired 6N Silicon, a manufacturer of low-cost silicon, and recently completed an additional round of financing from its current investors to continue capacity expansions.



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Hybrid Energy Signs 5 Year Distribution and Co-Development Agreement Adding Projected $25,000,000 Income
RENO, NV–(Marketwire – July 7, 2010) – Hybrid Energy Holdings, Inc. (PINKSHEETS: HYBE) reports today the signing of formal Development and Distribution Agreement wherein KS IP Holdings, LLC (KS-IPH) acquired exclusive development and distribution rights for specific consumer applications of the Photovoltaic (PV) and Solar Thermal technology Intellectual Properties (IP) previously acquired by HYBE.

The five year agreement calls for the payment to the Company of a minimum of $25 million over the first five year term, in a combination of fees and royalties. The parties will be announcing the first group of these product development projects upon completion of the patent protection and market analysis. Failure to meet royalty payment minimums or sales targets provide HYBE with termination options and license revocation terms.

The Company believes PV and Solar Thermal Market, particularly for residential and commercial use, is a high growth sector that promises to become a significant and vital energy option primed for strong sales growth of the company’s holdings and technologies. The worldwide market for Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) and Dye-Sensitive Cell (DSC)-based photovoltaics are expected to grow to $1 Billion with the next five years; and the Solar Thermal market anticipates 46% annual growth rates over the next decade.

The Development and Distribution Agreement represents the first of a series of income producing Joint Development Agreements flowing from the company’s new technology acquisitions and operations. These acquisitions were part of the Company’s foundation building Phase I of the Company’s strategic plan that called for traditional and proven fuel production acquisitions to build the Company’s revenue and asset base. Based on the strength of its asset base and growing revenue stream, the Company recently launched Phase II of its growth strategy and began its transition to alternative and renewable energy and technology revenue models.

The company’s New Energy Initiative calls for the aggressive investment in, and acquisition and development of nascent ‘New Energy’ technologies, Intellectual Property assets , and operations in the Clean Energy, Energy Smart Technologies and Carbon Capture & Storage sectors of the Energy Sector.

The Company has successfully established a strong and growing asset based of clean energy producing assets with strong recurring profits and cash-flows. The company has recently announced important clean and renewable energy assets as part of its transition to a sustainable and renewable energy revenue model. The company is assessing the acquisition of several new assets, operations and technologies and encourages further technology submittals and developmental joint ventures through the Merger & Acquisition portal at www.HybridEnergyHoldings.com



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PG&E Solar-Biomass Project Abandoned

PG&E Solar-Biomass Project Abandoned

biomass energy

California’s now-frenzied race to reach 20 percent renewable energy by the end of 2010 took a 107-megawatt step backward this week, as plans for a solar and biomass hybrid power plant were abandoned. PG&E and Luxembourg-based Martifer Renewables had been planning construction of the power plant for two years, but Martifer recently wrote the California Energy Commission (CEC), announcing that it was pulling out due to extensive delays stemming from local environmental concerns.

The San Joaquin Solar 1 & 2 power plant was to be located in the San Joaquin Valley near the town of Coalinga.biomass crops The area is one of the nation’s top agriculture-producing regions but has been troubled lately by drought and the resulting lack of water for irrigation. Therefore, already sensitive resident farmers found several concerns with the 640-acre power plant that would have helped significantly in the CEC’s renewable energy efforts.

The power plant was to utilize concentrated solar power (CSP) during the day, using the sun’s heat to boil water, creating steam to spin an electricity generating turbine. At night, biomass, or agricultural waste, from local farms would have been burnt in place of the solar thermal energy in order to continue plant operation around the clock.

However, the plant’s proposed location, Fresno County, happens to be troubled with some of the worst air pollution in the United States. So local residents were worried about the 60 to 80 annual truck deliveries of farm waste, including trimmings, clippings and sometimes manure.biomass manure They also took issue with the amount of water the plant would consume, an understandably sensitive issue in the drought-stricken valley.

Eventually frustrated beyond the breaking point, Martifer Renewables finally withdrew, shelving the project indefinitely — most likely for good.

Nevertheless, the San Joaquin Valley and Fresno County hold excellent potential for solar energy, whether the CEC meets its ambitious 2010 renewable energy goals or not. As the folks at Triplepundit point out, there are plenty of unanswered questions surrounding the abandoned project. Perhaps someday soon, researchers will make significant enough strides in cellulosic biofuels to create a solar-biomass power plant that can also use farm waste to make the fuels that power the trucks delivering the waste itself.

The lost 107 megawatts would have been enough renewable electricity to power about 75,000 California homes.

Source: Triplepundit
Photo Credit: DEKB, Princeton & BC Daily Buzz


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New biofuels processing method for mobile facilities
Chemical engineers have developed a new method to process agricultural waste and other biomass into biofuels, and they are proposing the creation of mobile processing plants that would rove the Midwest to produce the fuels.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Bloom Energy Makes Lower Carbon Electricity From Gas in Chattanooga, Tennessee


The state of Tennessee just got its first Bloom Energy “Server”, which turns any gaseous fuels into electricity using its cheaper new kind of fuel cell. Installed in collaboration with the TVA and the University of Tennessee Chattanooga, these 100 KW Bloom Boxes have just been installed on the top floor of the partnering EPB parking garage.

The University’s Smart Grid pioneer SimCenter National Center for Computational Engineering will monitor the performance of the technology, the University is reporting. The Bloom box is capable of making zero carbon electricity, given the right fuel. The campuses of major companies like eBay, Google, Staples, and FedEx are already running relatively uneventful pilot programs testing it.

The Bloom Box is fuel-agnostic. It could be used with landfill gas, or biogas from MSW or other waste gases, to make zero carbon electricity. It turns natural gas into electricity with a lower carbon footprint than a gas-fired power plant (which emits between 1.3 and 1.5 lbs of CO2 per kilowatt hour) with half the emissions at only 0.8 lbs of CO2 per kwh. (more…)


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Nissan Infiniti M35 Hybrid, To Be Launched Next Year, Drastically Improves Mileage
Nissan is planning to launch a new hybrid electric version of their luxury car Infiniti M35 Hybrid at the beginning of next year. Due to its new proprietary hybrid system, the car will be capable to compete against other full hybrids.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Nissan Infiniti M35 Hybrid, To Be Launched Next Year, Drastically Improves Mileage
Nissan is planning to launch a new hybrid electric version of their luxury car Infiniti M35 Hybrid at the beginning of next year. Due to its new proprietary hybrid system, the car will be capable to compete against other full hybrids.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Nissan Infiniti M35 Hybrid, To Be Launched Next Year, Drastically Improves Mileage
Nissan is planning to launch a new hybrid electric version of their luxury car Infiniti M35 Hybrid at the beginning of next year. Due to its new proprietary hybrid system, the car will be capable to compete against other full hybrids.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Plasmonic Motor Powered Mechanically and Directly by Light, Developed by UC Berkeley
Researchers from the University of California Berkeley, led by Xiang Zhang, a principal investigator with the university’s Materials Sciences Division and director of UC Berkeley’s Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (SINAM), demonstrated for the first time practically how light can actually move material nanometric particles of gold by using surface plasmons.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Forget About the Deficit – Invest in the Green Economy Now!
By Jerome E. Roos, Breakthrough Fellow.

This is a guest post from the Breakthrough Generation blog. Breakthrough Generation is the young leaders’ initiative of the Breakthrough Institute, a public policy think tank. Founded in 2007, Breakthrough Generation has fostered the development of young thought leaders capable of fully grappling with the scale and complexity of today’s greatest challenges and advancing large-scale solutions over the near and long term. To read more writings from this year’s 2010 Breakthrough Fellows, head to http://breakthroughgen.org

Europe has lost its mind. Just two years after the financial crisis pushed the global economy to the brink of collapse, we appear to have forgotten all historical lessons about the importance of stimulating aggregate demand in the face of an economic slowdown. All over the continent, deficit hawks have built their nests in the ivory towers of government, trapping the world’s largest economy back into the shackles of the neoliberal straitjacket.

If we are to truly deal with the two overwhelming crises of our time – climate change and economic meltdown – we need to realize where these crises overlap and where their solutions could reinforce one another. History teaches us that the world did not emerge from the Great Depression until it mobilized for World War II and built the War Economy. Today, we need mobilization on a similar scale to build a Green Economy and avert the worst consequences of climate change. In the process, we can create millions of jobs and forestall a global depression.

As the Greek debt crisis has recently illustrated, global speculators still hold just as much sway over currency and bond markets as investment bankers until recently held over financial markets. The musical chairs of global capital nearly forced the Eurozone to its knees earlier this year, triggering a backlash of primordial fear among European populations that economic apocalypse was imminent.

DeficitReduction.jpgIronically, nationalists, conservatives and free-market fundamentalists – that’s right, the folks responsible for causing the crisis in the first place! – were amply rewarded by utterly confused electorates for their misleadingly simple solution to our economic ills: deficit reduction at a pace faster than advocated by even the most hardcore hawks in the U.S.

While it seemed to some that Thatcher’s soul had died with the collapse of Lehman Brothers back in 2008, her macro-economic ghost has apparently come back to haunt our continent with a vengeance in 2010. “Balance the budget!” appears to be the most intellectually profound phrase coming out of the watering mouths of self-proclaimed economists like art-history student David Cameron of the UK, history student Mark Rutte of the Netherlands, and physics student Angela Merkel of Germany.

Now that our world is gradually coming undone at the seams, such executive incompetence is no longer just a source of amusement; it has become a threat to our collective well-being. Is this really the most creative solution we can come up with to solve the crises we are facing? With global temperatures rising higher every year and unemployment reaching levels not seen since the 1930s, is this really the mantra that will save global capitalism from itself?

GermanySavings.jpgLeading economists like Columbia’s Nobel Laureate Joe Stiglitz, Princeton’s Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman, and Harvard’s Dani Rodrik strongly disagree. These experts argue that we need growth before we can balance our budgets, and in order to revive growth, we need to first stimulate aggregate demand by making serious public investments in infrastructure and industry.

In an op-ed piece warning us of the oncoming Third Depression, Krugman argues that:

… this [coming] depression will be primarily a failure of policy. Around the world — most recently at last weekend’s deeply discouraging G-20 meeting — governments are obsessing about inflation when the real threat is deflation, preaching the need for belt-tightening when the real problem is inadequate spending.

In my home country of the Netherlands, we seem to have grown more terrified of short-term debt than long-term inundation as a result of climate change. But Joseph Stiglitz already pointed out several months ago that the conservative narrative on the problem of short-term debt is utterly misleading:

Faster growth and returns on public investment yield higher tax revenues, and a 5 to 6% return is more than enough to offset temporary increases in the national debt. A social cost-benefit analysis (taking into account impacts other than on the budget) makes such expenditures, even when debt-financed, even more attractive.

Dani Rodrik agrees, arguing that:

… Europe needs a short-term growth strategy to supplement its financial-support package and its plans for fiscal consolidation.

Such a short-term growth strategy should revolve around a visionary project for public investment in green infrastructure, like the replacement of our aging micro-grids with a much more efficient continental super-grid, the wholesale retrofitting of public buildings, the creation of a standardized plug-in recharging infrastructure, and more public-private collaborations on massive solar voltaic and wind projects. Such short-term public investments have the potential to create millions of jobs and kick-start the transformation to the Green Economy before the longer-term investments in R&D of breakthrough technologies kick in.

It is time for Europe’s hopelessly childish leaders to stop being bossed around by global speculators and start building the economy that will lead our continent into a new era. To actually get there, we first have to stop worrying about the imaginary climate for investors and start mobilizing to protect the physical climate for our people. This way we might just kill two birds with one stone.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Forget About the Deficit – Invest in the Green Economy Now!
By Jerome E. Roos, Breakthrough Fellow.

This is a guest post from the Breakthrough Generation blog. Breakthrough Generation is the young leaders’ initiative of the Breakthrough Institute, a public policy think tank. Founded in 2007, Breakthrough Generation has fostered the development of young thought leaders capable of fully grappling with the scale and complexity of today’s greatest challenges and advancing large-scale solutions over the near and long term. To read more writings from this year’s 2010 Breakthrough Fellows, head to http://breakthroughgen.org

Europe has lost its mind. Just two years after the financial crisis pushed the global economy to the brink of collapse, we appear to have forgotten all historical lessons about the importance of stimulating aggregate demand in the face of an economic slowdown. All over the continent, deficit hawks have built their nests in the ivory towers of government, trapping the world’s largest economy back into the shackles of the neoliberal straitjacket.

If we are to truly deal with the two overwhelming crises of our time – climate change and economic meltdown – we need to realize where these crises overlap and where their solutions could reinforce one another. History teaches us that the world did not emerge from the Great Depression until it mobilized for World War II and built the War Economy. Today, we need mobilization on a similar scale to build a Green Economy and avert the worst consequences of climate change. In the process, we can create millions of jobs and forestall a global depression.

As the Greek debt crisis has recently illustrated, global speculators still hold just as much sway over currency and bond markets as investment bankers until recently held over financial markets. The musical chairs of global capital nearly forced the Eurozone to its knees earlier this year, triggering a backlash of primordial fear among European populations that economic apocalypse was imminent.

DeficitReduction.jpgIronically, nationalists, conservatives and free-market fundamentalists – that’s right, the folks responsible for causing the crisis in the first place! – were amply rewarded by utterly confused electorates for their misleadingly simple solution to our economic ills: deficit reduction at a pace faster than advocated by even the most hardcore hawks in the U.S.

While it seemed to some that Thatcher’s soul had died with the collapse of Lehman Brothers back in 2008, her macro-economic ghost has apparently come back to haunt our continent with a vengeance in 2010. “Balance the budget!” appears to be the most intellectually profound phrase coming out of the watering mouths of self-proclaimed economists like art-history student David Cameron of the UK, history student Mark Rutte of the Netherlands, and physics student Angela Merkel of Germany.

Now that our world is gradually coming undone at the seams, such executive incompetence is no longer just a source of amusement; it has become a threat to our collective well-being. Is this really the most creative solution we can come up with to solve the crises we are facing? With global temperatures rising higher every year and unemployment reaching levels not seen since the 1930s, is this really the mantra that will save global capitalism from itself?

GermanySavings.jpgLeading economists like Columbia’s Nobel Laureate Joe Stiglitz, Princeton’s Nobel Laureate Paul Krugman, and Harvard’s Dani Rodrik strongly disagree. These experts argue that we need growth before we can balance our budgets, and in order to revive growth, we need to first stimulate aggregate demand by making serious public investments in infrastructure and industry.

In an op-ed piece warning us of the oncoming Third Depression, Krugman argues that:

… this [coming] depression will be primarily a failure of policy. Around the world — most recently at last weekend’s deeply discouraging G-20 meeting — governments are obsessing about inflation when the real threat is deflation, preaching the need for belt-tightening when the real problem is inadequate spending.

In my home country of the Netherlands, we seem to have grown more terrified of short-term debt than long-term inundation as a result of climate change. But Joseph Stiglitz already pointed out several months ago that the conservative narrative on the problem of short-term debt is utterly misleading:

Faster growth and returns on public investment yield higher tax revenues, and a 5 to 6% return is more than enough to offset temporary increases in the national debt. A social cost-benefit analysis (taking into account impacts other than on the budget) makes such expenditures, even when debt-financed, even more attractive.

Dani Rodrik agrees, arguing that:

… Europe needs a short-term growth strategy to supplement its financial-support package and its plans for fiscal consolidation.

Such a short-term growth strategy should revolve around a visionary project for public investment in green infrastructure, like the replacement of our aging micro-grids with a much more efficient continental super-grid, the wholesale retrofitting of public buildings, the creation of a standardized plug-in recharging infrastructure, and more public-private collaborations on massive solar voltaic and wind projects. Such short-term public investments have the potential to create millions of jobs and kick-start the transformation to the Green Economy before the longer-term investments in R&D of breakthrough technologies kick in.

It is time for Europe’s hopelessly childish leaders to stop being bossed around by global speculators and start building the economy that will lead our continent into a new era. To actually get there, we first have to stop worrying about the imaginary climate for investors and start mobilizing to protect the physical climate for our people. This way we might just kill two birds with one stone.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

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