Archive for October 27th, 2010

Chevy Volt Commercial Puts Emphasis on Driving Range
Total Range of About 350 Miles
It looks like GM has decided that the longer total range of the Chevy Volt compared to its all-electric competitors is the selling point that they want to highlight. The commercial above … Read the full story on TreeHugger
Visit the original post at: TreeHugger

Byrd hits the jackpot in Las Vegas

Byrd hits the jackpot in Las Vegas
Moments earlier, Byrd stood on the 18th green with Martin Laird and Cameron Percy as they discussed whether there was enough light to continue. They agreed to play one more hole – the 204-yard 17th at the TPC Summerlin.
Visit the original post at: TMCnet-News

Who’s offshore?

Who’s offshore?

Many companies exhibited their offshore inventory at the AWEA conference in Atlantic City earlier in October. Here’s a look at a few and what they have to offer.

Vestas V112 3.0-MW offshore turbine

The V112-3.0MW Offshore is designed to take full advantage of wind conditions at sea. It’s well suited for high offshore wind speeds and low turbulence and has the IEC IB offshore wind classification. It features what the company calls the GridStreamer, which has a permanent magnet generator to ensure wider opertaion range of the turbine and reduced loss of power, along with a full-scale converter that offers excellent grid support, reduced drive-train loads, and high energy productions over a greater range of wind speeds. Other features include:

-large rotor diam. (112 m), 54.65-m blades for high yield even at low (below 12 m/s) and medium wind speeds

-nacelle cover has the ability to close the integrated air intake holes and service hatches, and is 6.8 m installed (3.4 m for transport)

-The GridStreamer has the ability to continue to operate even during a severe grid voltage drop, converting excess power to heat and being able to quickly down-rate to 20%

-voltage range is 0.9-1.1 pu, frequency is 47-53 Hz, max short-circuit level 25kA, power factor range: 0.9 capacitive/0.83 inductive (HV transformer)

REpower 6M offshore turbine

REpower’s 6M offshore wind turbine stems from its 5M predecessor. The IEC IB class design is based on the company’s philosophies including conservative component design, ease of transportation, and grid compatibility. The turbine has a safety system including individually adjustable blades (electrically controlled), redundant temperature and speed sensing system, lightning protection, rotor holding brake with soft-brake function, and automatic fire protection system. Other features include:

-a power rating of 6,150 kW

-offshore cut-in wind speed of 14 m/s and cut-out at 30 m/s

-rotor diam. is 126 m, with fiberglass-reinforced plastic rotor blades 61.5 m

-hub height is 85-95 m (site specific)

-frequency is 50 Hz

Siemens SWT-2.3 and 3.6 offshore turbine

Rotor blades are made of fiberglass-reinforced epoxy and manufactured through what the company calls its Integralblade process. This means the blades are cast in one piece in a closed process, leaving no weak points at glue joints. An automatic lubrication system for major components of the nacelle (main shaft, gear box, and yaw system) enables continued operation even if maintenance is severely delayed by weather.  The offshore turbines are normally mounted on tubular steel towers fitted with internal hoists and comply with all relevant grid codes due to a NetConverter system that uses full conversion of the generated power. Other features of the 3.6 include:

-107-m diameter, blade length 52 m, and hub height 80 m or site specific

-3,600-kW generator with 690 V

-cut-in wind speed of 3-5 m/s and cut-out of 25 m/s

-NetConverter system is a modular arrangement for easy maintenance. Power is transferred by DC from rectifier installed in nacelle to inverter in tower bottom, minimizing cabling losses and avoided complications  from nacelle-mounted transformer

GE 4.0-110  offshore turbine

Growing from a 3-MW turbine in 2005, to a 3.5-MW model in 2007, GEdevelops its 4.0-MW offshore turbine in 2010. The turbine is built around a permanent magnet generator, delivering high efficiency at low wind speed. With direct-drive technology, the turbine removes the single most costly failure in offshore, gearboxes, and replaces it with reliable, slow-speed  components designed for the offshore environment. With a spacious nacelle and internal hub access, the IEC class turbine offers maintenance and safety advantages. Other features include:

-rotor diameter of 110 m

-cut-in wind speed of 3 m/s and cut out of 25 m/s

-At just 10 rpm, magnets at the rotor tip move at about 188 m/min. The generator’s 20 sections or modules allow replacing a portion of it without a complete removal of the 90-ton unit.

-Two main bearings transfer axial and bending loads from rotor to bedplate for higher reliability. The unit also sports continuous close-wind tracking to capture more energy.

-No yaw brakes or hydraulics.

Gamesa G11X 5.0-MW offshore turbine

A progression from the G10X 4.5-MW turbine, Gamesa is developing the G11X designed for variable and often extreme marine conditions, inclement weather, and challenging accessibility. A multi-variable control system minimizes blade vibration and reduces blade loads up to 30%. A permanent magnet generator and full converter comply with demanding grid code and connection requirements. Because of it’s modular design, the system keeps running even if any of the individual modules fail. A two-stage planetary integrated gear box with dual bearing design improves reliability by using fewer parts and avoiding the use of high speed bearings. The blades feature an airfoil design and the nacelle is designed to be spacious for technicians and tools, helping to reduce overall maintenance times and ensure safety. Gamesa has partnered with American shipbuilder Northrop Grumman to launch a prototype in the U.S. The two companies plan to install two of the turbines by 2012. Other features include:

-rotor diameter of 115 m

-3 upwind blades

-hub height adapted to site requirement (75-100 m)


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Who’s offshore?

Who’s offshore?

Many companies exhibited their offshore inventory at the AWEA conference in Atlantic City earlier in October. Here’s a look at a few and what they have to offer.

Vestas V112 3.0-MW offshore turbine

The V112-3.0MW Offshore is designed to take full advantage of wind conditions at sea. It’s well suited for high offshore wind speeds and low turbulence and has the IEC IB offshore wind classification. It features what the company calls the GridStreamer, which has a permanent magnet generator to ensure wider opertaion range of the turbine and reduced loss of power, along with a full-scale converter that offers excellent grid support, reduced drive-train loads, and high energy productions over a greater range of wind speeds. Other features include:

-large rotor diam. (112 m), 54.65-m blades for high yield even at low (below 12 m/s) and medium wind speeds

-nacelle cover has the ability to close the integrated air intake holes and service hatches, and is 6.8 m installed (3.4 m for transport)

-The GridStreamer has the ability to continue to operate even during a severe grid voltage drop, converting excess power to heat and being able to quickly down-rate to 20%

-voltage range is 0.9-1.1 pu, frequency is 47-53 Hz, max short-circuit level 25kA, power factor range: 0.9 capacitive/0.83 inductive (HV transformer)

REpower 6M offshore turbine

REpower’s 6M offshore wind turbine stems from its 5M predecessor. The IEC IB class design is based on the company’s philosophies including conservative component design, ease of transportation, and grid compatibility. The turbine has a safety system including individually adjustable blades (electrically controlled), redundant temperature and speed sensing system, lightning protection, rotor holding brake with soft-brake function, and automatic fire protection system. Other features include:

-a power rating of 6,150 kW

-offshore cut-in wind speed of 14 m/s and cut-out at 30 m/s

-rotor diam. is 126 m, with fiberglass-reinforced plastic rotor blades 61.5 m

-hub height is 85-95 m (site specific)

-frequency is 50 Hz

Siemens SWT-2.3 and 3.6 offshore turbine

Rotor blades are made of fiberglass-reinforced epoxy and manufactured through what the company calls its Integralblade process. This means the blades are cast in one piece in a closed process, leaving no weak points at glue joints. An automatic lubrication system for major components of the nacelle (main shaft, gear box, and yaw system) enables continued operation even if maintenance is severely delayed by weather.  The offshore turbines are normally mounted on tubular steel towers fitted with internal hoists and comply with all relevant grid codes due to a NetConverter system that uses full conversion of the generated power. Other features of the 3.6 include:

-107-m diameter, blade length 52 m, and hub height 80 m or site specific

-3,600-kW generator with 690 V

-cut-in wind speed of 3-5 m/s and cut-out of 25 m/s

-NetConverter system is a modular arrangement for easy maintenance. Power is transferred by DC from rectifier installed in nacelle to inverter in tower bottom, minimizing cabling losses and avoided complications  from nacelle-mounted transformer

GE 4.0-110  offshore turbine

Growing from a 3-MW turbine in 2005, to a 3.5-MW model in 2007, GEdevelops its 4.0-MW offshore turbine in 2010. The turbine is built around a permanent magnet generator, delivering high efficiency at low wind speed. With direct-drive technology, the turbine removes the single most costly failure in offshore, gearboxes, and replaces it with reliable, slow-speed  components designed for the offshore environment. With a spacious nacelle and internal hub access, the IEC class turbine offers maintenance and safety advantages. Other features include:

-rotor diameter of 110 m

-cut-in wind speed of 3 m/s and cut out of 25 m/s

-At just 10 rpm, magnets at the rotor tip move at about 188 m/min. The generator’s 20 sections or modules allow replacing a portion of it without a complete removal of the 90-ton unit.

-Two main bearings transfer axial and bending loads from rotor to bedplate for higher reliability. The unit also sports continuous close-wind tracking to capture more energy.

-No yaw brakes or hydraulics.

Gamesa G11X 5.0-MW offshore turbine

A progression from the G10X 4.5-MW turbine, Gamesa is developing the G11X designed for variable and often extreme marine conditions, inclement weather, and challenging accessibility. A multi-variable control system minimizes blade vibration and reduces blade loads up to 30%. A permanent magnet generator and full converter comply with demanding grid code and connection requirements. Because of it’s modular design, the system keeps running even if any of the individual modules fail. A two-stage planetary integrated gear box with dual bearing design improves reliability by using fewer parts and avoiding the use of high speed bearings. The blades feature an airfoil design and the nacelle is designed to be spacious for technicians and tools, helping to reduce overall maintenance times and ensure safety. Gamesa has partnered with American shipbuilder Northrop Grumman to launch a prototype in the U.S. The two companies plan to install two of the turbines by 2012. Other features include:

-rotor diameter of 115 m

-3 upwind blades

-hub height adapted to site requirement (75-100 m)


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Reid Supply expands government product line

Reid Supply Company recently announced the addition of approximately 10,000 new products to their General Services Administration (GSA) government buyer’s contract.

Tammy Dahlstrom, Government Sales Manager for Reid Supply, says the company has expanded its sales force to accommodate a recent increased demand for government buyers.

“Since receiving our contract in July, 2006, our government sales continue to grow consistently and steadily,” says Dahlstrom. “Adding products and staff to accommodate that growth, was part of our planned expansion to better serve our government customers,”

“Reid is proud to be a government services supplier”, says John Carrier, President of Reid Supply Company. “With our expansion of nearly 10,000 new products and with new personnel, I know that we will continue to serve our GSA customers better than anyone in the industrial products business.”

Reid’s product offering features the following categories:
· Knobs, Handles & Hand Wheels
· Clamps and Workholding
· Tooling Components
· Fasteners and Hardware
· Leveling Devices and Vibration Control
· Material Handling
· Bearings and Power Transmission
· Metalworking
· Maintenance, Repair and Operations (MRO)
· Pneumatics and Hydraulics
· Structural Systems
· Safety Supplies

Reid Supply


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Preparing Your Home for Winter

Preparing Your Home for Winter

4 Tips For Preparing Your Home For Winter
By Cecil Flynn

The cold winds come upon us fast, are you ready? Have you done what it takes to prepare your home and yard for heavy snow and ice, not to mention stiff winds? If you want to have a safe and comfortable winter you need to prepare now.

After enjoying a warm summer, the last thing we want to think about is bundling up to stay warm. But that is exactly what your home needs. A little tender loving care given to your home now will help you stay toasty warm and safe all winter long.

1. Seal the Gaps

It is amazing where the drafts come from. Cold air can seep in around window seams, door jambs and even electrical outlets that are positions on outside walls. Seal up windows by applying a thin bead of silicone caulking along the joint of the window and window seal. This type of caulking will provide an airtight, flexible seal. It is important for the seal to be flexible so it can expand and contract with the temperature changes.

Apply weather stripping around drafty door jams and use silicone caulk along the bottom of the door where it meets the floor. If you have carpeting up to the door, apply the caulking on the outside of the door, just under the threshold.

For electrical outlets, you can buy foam outlet sealers. These pre-cut seals are made of a thin foam material. They are standard size and easy to install. Just remove the outer plate and put the foam insulators in the outlet box. These are great for stopping drafts and can be found at most home improvement stores.

2. Insulate

Most homes lose a large amount of heat through the roof and foundation. Take some time to check on the condition of your insulation and consider adding more if necessary. This is a job that can be contracted to a professional or you can do it yourself. Most home improvement stores have information about how to insulate your home properly.

3. Check the Roof

Can your roof withstand the weight of snow and ice? Snow may look fluffy and soft, but it is heavy! Many times you will see reports on the news about collapsed roofs on homes because of the weight of snow. It would be wise to add heat tape or another type of ice melt along the bottom of your roof to help promote the melting of ice and snow and lessen the load on your roof.

4. Trim the Limbs

The winter snow and ice can create havoc with tree limbs. Especially those that hang over power lines or buildings. If you have large limbs that could pose a threat to either of these things, now is the time to trim them. You don’t want to have to deal with the extensive damage that can be caused by heavy limbs falling on your or your neighbor’s home!

In addition to these four tips, always have ice melt and a snow shovel on hand. Winter storms can take you by surprise, but if you are prepared you can stay snug as can be in your nice warm home!

Cecil loves to do home improvement projects and tinker in his workshop. He likes the advantage a professional weather station gives him when it comes to checking the weather. He is an amateur weather buff who loves checking his digital weather station for the latest weather information.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Preparing Your Home for Winter

Preparing Your Home for Winter

4 Tips For Preparing Your Home For Winter
By Cecil Flynn

The cold winds come upon us fast, are you ready? Have you done what it takes to prepare your home and yard for heavy snow and ice, not to mention stiff winds? If you want to have a safe and comfortable winter you need to prepare now.

After enjoying a warm summer, the last thing we want to think about is bundling up to stay warm. But that is exactly what your home needs. A little tender loving care given to your home now will help you stay toasty warm and safe all winter long.

1. Seal the Gaps

It is amazing where the drafts come from. Cold air can seep in around window seams, door jambs and even electrical outlets that are positions on outside walls. Seal up windows by applying a thin bead of silicone caulking along the joint of the window and window seal. This type of caulking will provide an airtight, flexible seal. It is important for the seal to be flexible so it can expand and contract with the temperature changes.

Apply weather stripping around drafty door jams and use silicone caulk along the bottom of the door where it meets the floor. If you have carpeting up to the door, apply the caulking on the outside of the door, just under the threshold.

For electrical outlets, you can buy foam outlet sealers. These pre-cut seals are made of a thin foam material. They are standard size and easy to install. Just remove the outer plate and put the foam insulators in the outlet box. These are great for stopping drafts and can be found at most home improvement stores.

2. Insulate

Most homes lose a large amount of heat through the roof and foundation. Take some time to check on the condition of your insulation and consider adding more if necessary. This is a job that can be contracted to a professional or you can do it yourself. Most home improvement stores have information about how to insulate your home properly.

3. Check the Roof

Can your roof withstand the weight of snow and ice? Snow may look fluffy and soft, but it is heavy! Many times you will see reports on the news about collapsed roofs on homes because of the weight of snow. It would be wise to add heat tape or another type of ice melt along the bottom of your roof to help promote the melting of ice and snow and lessen the load on your roof.

4. Trim the Limbs

The winter snow and ice can create havoc with tree limbs. Especially those that hang over power lines or buildings. If you have large limbs that could pose a threat to either of these things, now is the time to trim them. You don’t want to have to deal with the extensive damage that can be caused by heavy limbs falling on your or your neighbor’s home!

In addition to these four tips, always have ice melt and a snow shovel on hand. Winter storms can take you by surprise, but if you are prepared you can stay snug as can be in your nice warm home!

Cecil loves to do home improvement projects and tinker in his workshop. He likes the advantage a professional weather station gives him when it comes to checking the weather. He is an amateur weather buff who loves checking his digital weather station for the latest weather information.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Preparing Your Home for Winter

Preparing Your Home for Winter

4 Tips For Preparing Your Home For Winter
By Cecil Flynn

The cold winds come upon us fast, are you ready? Have you done what it takes to prepare your home and yard for heavy snow and ice, not to mention stiff winds? If you want to have a safe and comfortable winter you need to prepare now.

After enjoying a warm summer, the last thing we want to think about is bundling up to stay warm. But that is exactly what your home needs. A little tender loving care given to your home now will help you stay toasty warm and safe all winter long.

1. Seal the Gaps

It is amazing where the drafts come from. Cold air can seep in around window seams, door jambs and even electrical outlets that are positions on outside walls. Seal up windows by applying a thin bead of silicone caulking along the joint of the window and window seal. This type of caulking will provide an airtight, flexible seal. It is important for the seal to be flexible so it can expand and contract with the temperature changes.

Apply weather stripping around drafty door jams and use silicone caulk along the bottom of the door where it meets the floor. If you have carpeting up to the door, apply the caulking on the outside of the door, just under the threshold.

For electrical outlets, you can buy foam outlet sealers. These pre-cut seals are made of a thin foam material. They are standard size and easy to install. Just remove the outer plate and put the foam insulators in the outlet box. These are great for stopping drafts and can be found at most home improvement stores.

2. Insulate

Most homes lose a large amount of heat through the roof and foundation. Take some time to check on the condition of your insulation and consider adding more if necessary. This is a job that can be contracted to a professional or you can do it yourself. Most home improvement stores have information about how to insulate your home properly.

3. Check the Roof

Can your roof withstand the weight of snow and ice? Snow may look fluffy and soft, but it is heavy! Many times you will see reports on the news about collapsed roofs on homes because of the weight of snow. It would be wise to add heat tape or another type of ice melt along the bottom of your roof to help promote the melting of ice and snow and lessen the load on your roof.

4. Trim the Limbs

The winter snow and ice can create havoc with tree limbs. Especially those that hang over power lines or buildings. If you have large limbs that could pose a threat to either of these things, now is the time to trim them. You don’t want to have to deal with the extensive damage that can be caused by heavy limbs falling on your or your neighbor’s home!

In addition to these four tips, always have ice melt and a snow shovel on hand. Winter storms can take you by surprise, but if you are prepared you can stay snug as can be in your nice warm home!

Cecil loves to do home improvement projects and tinker in his workshop. He likes the advantage a professional weather station gives him when it comes to checking the weather. He is an amateur weather buff who loves checking his digital weather station for the latest weather information.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Florida Inmates to Get Solar Panel Installation Training

What’s one of the hardest things to do after getting released from prison? Finding a job. With clean tech, and especially solar energy, booming, helping such people get trained for and find jobs in the solar industry is a great way to re-assimilate them into society and ensure they get on their own two feet quickly. It looks like Florida is taking the lead on that front.

With a $740,000 grant from the federal government, the Florida Department of Corrections is about to establish a program for “training inmates nearing release to become certified in Photovoltaic System (solar panel) installation.”

The International Business Times reports:

The Department’s Teaching and Enhancing Careers in High technology (TECH) program will be established at Sago Palm Work Camp in Palm Beach county, which recently became the third prison dedicated to preparing soon-to-be released inmates for their successful re-entry into society. Re-entry facilities house inmates with three years or less on their sentences who are returning to specific counties, and ramp up their educational, vocational and treatment classes so they’ll be better prepared to find employment and keep it upon release.

The grant funds will be used to provide remedial academic tutoring; a nine month, 1,200 hour Electrical Technology Career and Technical Education component; on-the-job training; peer mentoring; case management; and post-release career assistance. The Department will partner with a fully licensed and accredited technical center in the Palm Beach area to provide Solar PV System training, leading to inmates earning a North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners certificate prior to release. Training will include a mobile training unit that houses a PV demonstration module so inmates can gain hands-on experience

Great to see my home state of Florida taking the lead on both inmate re-integration into society and advancement of clean tech like solar.

The grant Florida was awarded was part of the Department of Justice’s Second Chance Act Technology Careers Training Demonstration Projects for Incarcerated Adults.

Like this article? Connect with me on FacebookStumbleUponTwitter, or Care2.

Photo Credit: Chandra Marsono via flickr (CC license)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Florida Inmates to Get Solar Panel Installation Training

What’s one of the hardest things to do after getting released from prison? Finding a job. With clean tech, and especially solar energy, booming, helping such people get trained for and find jobs in the solar industry is a great way to re-assimilate them into society and ensure they get on their own two feet quickly. It looks like Florida is taking the lead on that front.

With a $740,000 grant from the federal government, the Florida Department of Corrections is about to establish a program for “training inmates nearing release to become certified in Photovoltaic System (solar panel) installation.”

The International Business Times reports:

The Department’s Teaching and Enhancing Careers in High technology (TECH) program will be established at Sago Palm Work Camp in Palm Beach county, which recently became the third prison dedicated to preparing soon-to-be released inmates for their successful re-entry into society. Re-entry facilities house inmates with three years or less on their sentences who are returning to specific counties, and ramp up their educational, vocational and treatment classes so they’ll be better prepared to find employment and keep it upon release.

The grant funds will be used to provide remedial academic tutoring; a nine month, 1,200 hour Electrical Technology Career and Technical Education component; on-the-job training; peer mentoring; case management; and post-release career assistance. The Department will partner with a fully licensed and accredited technical center in the Palm Beach area to provide Solar PV System training, leading to inmates earning a North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners certificate prior to release. Training will include a mobile training unit that houses a PV demonstration module so inmates can gain hands-on experience

Great to see my home state of Florida taking the lead on both inmate re-integration into society and advancement of clean tech like solar.

The grant Florida was awarded was part of the Department of Justice’s Second Chance Act Technology Careers Training Demonstration Projects for Incarcerated Adults.

Like this article? Connect with me on FacebookStumbleUponTwitter, or Care2.

Photo Credit: Chandra Marsono via flickr (CC license)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Florida Inmates to Get Solar Panel Installation Training

What’s one of the hardest things to do after getting released from prison? Finding a job. With clean tech, and especially solar energy, booming, helping such people get trained for and find jobs in the solar industry is a great way to re-assimilate them into society and ensure they get on their own two feet quickly. It looks like Florida is taking the lead on that front.

With a $740,000 grant from the federal government, the Florida Department of Corrections is about to establish a program for “training inmates nearing release to become certified in Photovoltaic System (solar panel) installation.”

The International Business Times reports:

The Department’s Teaching and Enhancing Careers in High technology (TECH) program will be established at Sago Palm Work Camp in Palm Beach county, which recently became the third prison dedicated to preparing soon-to-be released inmates for their successful re-entry into society. Re-entry facilities house inmates with three years or less on their sentences who are returning to specific counties, and ramp up their educational, vocational and treatment classes so they’ll be better prepared to find employment and keep it upon release.

The grant funds will be used to provide remedial academic tutoring; a nine month, 1,200 hour Electrical Technology Career and Technical Education component; on-the-job training; peer mentoring; case management; and post-release career assistance. The Department will partner with a fully licensed and accredited technical center in the Palm Beach area to provide Solar PV System training, leading to inmates earning a North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners certificate prior to release. Training will include a mobile training unit that houses a PV demonstration module so inmates can gain hands-on experience

Great to see my home state of Florida taking the lead on both inmate re-integration into society and advancement of clean tech like solar.

The grant Florida was awarded was part of the Department of Justice’s Second Chance Act Technology Careers Training Demonstration Projects for Incarcerated Adults.

Like this article? Connect with me on FacebookStumbleUponTwitter, or Care2.

Photo Credit: Chandra Marsono via flickr (CC license)


Visit the original post at: Energy News

5 GigaWatt Solar Power Field To Be Built In South Africa
South Africa has recently unveiled plans for building world’s biggest solar energy park, which, according to officials, will be capable of producing about 5GW of clean electricity.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

US Solar Boom Requires $ 100 Bn Investment
Rapidly declining equipment costs combined with stronger government
support have set the stage for explosive growth in the US solar market
over the next decade, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the
world's leading provider of research and analysis into clean energy
and the carbon markets.

Solar-powered generating capacity – using photovoltaic and solar
thermal electricity technologies – could reach 4.3% of the nation's
power capacity by 2020, depending on the industry's ability to attract
an estimated $100bn of investment.

The US today has just 1.4 gigawatts of installed solar power capacity,
ranking it fifth globally. But that could rise to 44 gigawatts by
2020, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. In a new report,
forecast capacity from large-scale solar thermal projects is projected
to rise from 0.4 gigawatts currently to 14 gigawatts by 2020. For
photovoltaics, the group anticipates a 34% annual growth rate to 30
gigawatts by 2020.

Bloomberg New Energy Finance research shows that the cost of a typical
photovoltaic module has dropped by more than half over the past two
years. However, solar power is still expensive compared to other power
sources. The group's latest analysis places the unsubsidized cost of
best-in-class photovoltaic and solar thermal electricity generation at
just below $200/megawatt-hour — nearly four times the equivalent cost
for a coal-fired power plant ($56/megawatt-hour) — and between two
and four times the cost of onshore wind power.

Michael Liebreich, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance
said: “There is a very positive growth story for solar in the US: a
few more years of support, and then the engine of unsubsidized
competitiveness will take over – and the world will never be the same.
The important thing right now is to ensure policy stability, to give
investors confidence during this critical period. The US solar
industry will require private sector investment of $100bn during the
next decade, and any hint that the government's commitment to clean
energy could waver and investors will run for cover.”
Source: http://www.bnef.com


Visit the original post at: Energy News

US Solar Boom Requires $ 100 Bn Investment
Rapidly declining equipment costs combined with stronger government
support have set the stage for explosive growth in the US solar market
over the next decade, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the
world's leading provider of research and analysis into clean energy
and the carbon markets.

Solar-powered generating capacity – using photovoltaic and solar
thermal electricity technologies – could reach 4.3% of the nation's
power capacity by 2020, depending on the industry's ability to attract
an estimated $100bn of investment.

The US today has just 1.4 gigawatts of installed solar power capacity,
ranking it fifth globally. But that could rise to 44 gigawatts by
2020, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. In a new report,
forecast capacity from large-scale solar thermal projects is projected
to rise from 0.4 gigawatts currently to 14 gigawatts by 2020. For
photovoltaics, the group anticipates a 34% annual growth rate to 30
gigawatts by 2020.

Bloomberg New Energy Finance research shows that the cost of a typical
photovoltaic module has dropped by more than half over the past two
years. However, solar power is still expensive compared to other power
sources. The group's latest analysis places the unsubsidized cost of
best-in-class photovoltaic and solar thermal electricity generation at
just below $200/megawatt-hour — nearly four times the equivalent cost
for a coal-fired power plant ($56/megawatt-hour) — and between two
and four times the cost of onshore wind power.

Michael Liebreich, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance
said: “There is a very positive growth story for solar in the US: a
few more years of support, and then the engine of unsubsidized
competitiveness will take over – and the world will never be the same.
The important thing right now is to ensure policy stability, to give
investors confidence during this critical period. The US solar
industry will require private sector investment of $100bn during the
next decade, and any hint that the government's commitment to clean
energy could waver and investors will run for cover.”
Source: http://www.bnef.com


Visit the original post at: Energy News

404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /getlinks.php was not found on this server.


Apache/2.2.15 (CentOS) Server at prsape.jasonnevins.ru Port 80