Archive for January 20th, 2011

Wind profiling in South Africa

Wind profiling in South Africa

Triton is a remote sensing system that uses sodar (sound detection and ranging) to measure wind at higher heights than the previous tower-based standard. By measuring wind speeds at the turbine rotor’s hub height and beyond, up to 200 meters, Triton reduces uncertainty in annual energy production (AEP) forecasts.

South Africa’s wind resources are estimated by SAWEA (South African Wind Energy Association) to exceed 30 GW. The country has a relatively modest 10 MW of installed wind capacity currently, but the government has a target of generating 10,000 GWh of power from renewable energy source by 2013 (700 MW of which will come from wind). Several of the world’s leading wind turbine OEMs, project developers and service providers have already established a presence in South Africa.

Just six months after entering the South African wind power market, turbine manufacturer Second Wind has sold eight Triton sonic wind profilers and partnered with WISE-Wind Information Sentinel, a wind data services provider, to support anticipated demand for Second Wind’s products.

The company delivered and installed its first Tritons in South Africa in June 2010. Since then, the Boston-based company has taken orders for five more units, including several repeat orders from international wind developer Windlab, which has a development pipeline of just over 2,000 MW in South Africa. The South African Triton implementations have been highly successful, with better than 99.7% uptime.

“Triton has taken off in South Africa very quickly, and we see that as an indication of strong future demand,” says Second Wind Vice President of Sales Peter Gibson. “South Africa is an important emerging market. The government has policy incentives in place and has announced its intention to build a clean energy economy, so we see a lot of opportunity in the near and long terms.”

Second Wind’s partnership with WISE (Wind Information Sentinel), a Triton-certified partner that also provides support for the company’s products in Australia and New Zealand. WISE will provide certified local resources (including Cape Town–based meteorological instrument supplier AfriWeather and leading wind consultant Wind Prospect) to install, redeploy, and field service Tritons in South Africa. WISE and AfriWeather will also provide installation and maintenance support services on a number of the Triton units being installed in South Africa in early 2011.

Second Wind www.secondwind.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Wind profiling in South Africa

Wind profiling in South Africa

Triton is a remote sensing system that uses sodar (sound detection and ranging) to measure wind at higher heights than the previous tower-based standard. By measuring wind speeds at the turbine rotor’s hub height and beyond, up to 200 meters, Triton reduces uncertainty in annual energy production (AEP) forecasts.

South Africa’s wind resources are estimated by SAWEA (South African Wind Energy Association) to exceed 30 GW. The country has a relatively modest 10 MW of installed wind capacity currently, but the government has a target of generating 10,000 GWh of power from renewable energy source by 2013 (700 MW of which will come from wind). Several of the world’s leading wind turbine OEMs, project developers and service providers have already established a presence in South Africa.

Just six months after entering the South African wind power market, turbine manufacturer Second Wind has sold eight Triton sonic wind profilers and partnered with WISE-Wind Information Sentinel, a wind data services provider, to support anticipated demand for Second Wind’s products.

The company delivered and installed its first Tritons in South Africa in June 2010. Since then, the Boston-based company has taken orders for five more units, including several repeat orders from international wind developer Windlab, which has a development pipeline of just over 2,000 MW in South Africa. The South African Triton implementations have been highly successful, with better than 99.7% uptime.

“Triton has taken off in South Africa very quickly, and we see that as an indication of strong future demand,” says Second Wind Vice President of Sales Peter Gibson. “South Africa is an important emerging market. The government has policy incentives in place and has announced its intention to build a clean energy economy, so we see a lot of opportunity in the near and long terms.”

Second Wind’s partnership with WISE (Wind Information Sentinel), a Triton-certified partner that also provides support for the company’s products in Australia and New Zealand. WISE will provide certified local resources (including Cape Town–based meteorological instrument supplier AfriWeather and leading wind consultant Wind Prospect) to install, redeploy, and field service Tritons in South Africa. WISE and AfriWeather will also provide installation and maintenance support services on a number of the Triton units being installed in South Africa in early 2011.

Second Wind www.secondwind.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Wind profiling in South Africa

Wind profiling in South Africa

Triton is a remote sensing system that uses sodar (sound detection and ranging) to measure wind at higher heights than the previous tower-based standard. By measuring wind speeds at the turbine rotor’s hub height and beyond, up to 200 meters, Triton reduces uncertainty in annual energy production (AEP) forecasts.

South Africa’s wind resources are estimated by SAWEA (South African Wind Energy Association) to exceed 30 GW. The country has a relatively modest 10 MW of installed wind capacity currently, but the government has a target of generating 10,000 GWh of power from renewable energy source by 2013 (700 MW of which will come from wind). Several of the world’s leading wind turbine OEMs, project developers and service providers have already established a presence in South Africa.

Just six months after entering the South African wind power market, turbine manufacturer Second Wind has sold eight Triton sonic wind profilers and partnered with WISE-Wind Information Sentinel, a wind data services provider, to support anticipated demand for Second Wind’s products.

The company delivered and installed its first Tritons in South Africa in June 2010. Since then, the Boston-based company has taken orders for five more units, including several repeat orders from international wind developer Windlab, which has a development pipeline of just over 2,000 MW in South Africa. The South African Triton implementations have been highly successful, with better than 99.7% uptime.

“Triton has taken off in South Africa very quickly, and we see that as an indication of strong future demand,” says Second Wind Vice President of Sales Peter Gibson. “South Africa is an important emerging market. The government has policy incentives in place and has announced its intention to build a clean energy economy, so we see a lot of opportunity in the near and long terms.”

Second Wind’s partnership with WISE (Wind Information Sentinel), a Triton-certified partner that also provides support for the company’s products in Australia and New Zealand. WISE will provide certified local resources (including Cape Town–based meteorological instrument supplier AfriWeather and leading wind consultant Wind Prospect) to install, redeploy, and field service Tritons in South Africa. WISE and AfriWeather will also provide installation and maintenance support services on a number of the Triton units being installed in South Africa in early 2011.

Second Wind www.secondwind.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Wind profiling in South Africa

Wind profiling in South Africa

Triton is a remote sensing system that uses sodar (sound detection and ranging) to measure wind at higher heights than the previous tower-based standard. By measuring wind speeds at the turbine rotor’s hub height and beyond, up to 200 meters, Triton reduces uncertainty in annual energy production (AEP) forecasts.

South Africa’s wind resources are estimated by SAWEA (South African Wind Energy Association) to exceed 30 GW. The country has a relatively modest 10 MW of installed wind capacity currently, but the government has a target of generating 10,000 GWh of power from renewable energy source by 2013 (700 MW of which will come from wind). Several of the world’s leading wind turbine OEMs, project developers and service providers have already established a presence in South Africa.

Just six months after entering the South African wind power market, turbine manufacturer Second Wind has sold eight Triton sonic wind profilers and partnered with WISE-Wind Information Sentinel, a wind data services provider, to support anticipated demand for Second Wind’s products.

The company delivered and installed its first Tritons in South Africa in June 2010. Since then, the Boston-based company has taken orders for five more units, including several repeat orders from international wind developer Windlab, which has a development pipeline of just over 2,000 MW in South Africa. The South African Triton implementations have been highly successful, with better than 99.7% uptime.

“Triton has taken off in South Africa very quickly, and we see that as an indication of strong future demand,” says Second Wind Vice President of Sales Peter Gibson. “South Africa is an important emerging market. The government has policy incentives in place and has announced its intention to build a clean energy economy, so we see a lot of opportunity in the near and long terms.”

Second Wind’s partnership with WISE (Wind Information Sentinel), a Triton-certified partner that also provides support for the company’s products in Australia and New Zealand. WISE will provide certified local resources (including Cape Town–based meteorological instrument supplier AfriWeather and leading wind consultant Wind Prospect) to install, redeploy, and field service Tritons in South Africa. WISE and AfriWeather will also provide installation and maintenance support services on a number of the Triton units being installed in South Africa in early 2011.

Second Wind www.secondwind.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Wind profiling in South Africa

Wind profiling in South Africa

Triton is a remote sensing system that uses sodar (sound detection and ranging) to measure wind at higher heights than the previous tower-based standard. By measuring wind speeds at the turbine rotor’s hub height and beyond, up to 200 meters, Triton reduces uncertainty in annual energy production (AEP) forecasts.

South Africa’s wind resources are estimated by SAWEA (South African Wind Energy Association) to exceed 30 GW. The country has a relatively modest 10 MW of installed wind capacity currently, but the government has a target of generating 10,000 GWh of power from renewable energy source by 2013 (700 MW of which will come from wind). Several of the world’s leading wind turbine OEMs, project developers and service providers have already established a presence in South Africa.

Just six months after entering the South African wind power market, turbine manufacturer Second Wind has sold eight Triton sonic wind profilers and partnered with WISE-Wind Information Sentinel, a wind data services provider, to support anticipated demand for Second Wind’s products.

The company delivered and installed its first Tritons in South Africa in June 2010. Since then, the Boston-based company has taken orders for five more units, including several repeat orders from international wind developer Windlab, which has a development pipeline of just over 2,000 MW in South Africa. The South African Triton implementations have been highly successful, with better than 99.7% uptime.

“Triton has taken off in South Africa very quickly, and we see that as an indication of strong future demand,” says Second Wind Vice President of Sales Peter Gibson. “South Africa is an important emerging market. The government has policy incentives in place and has announced its intention to build a clean energy economy, so we see a lot of opportunity in the near and long terms.”

Second Wind’s partnership with WISE (Wind Information Sentinel), a Triton-certified partner that also provides support for the company’s products in Australia and New Zealand. WISE will provide certified local resources (including Cape Town–based meteorological instrument supplier AfriWeather and leading wind consultant Wind Prospect) to install, redeploy, and field service Tritons in South Africa. WISE and AfriWeather will also provide installation and maintenance support services on a number of the Triton units being installed in South Africa in early 2011.

Second Wind www.secondwind.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

China-US green ink deals

China-US green ink deals

Cooperation on clean energy could be a high point in U.S.-China relations, benefiting both countries, government and business officials said ahead of a summit between Chinese President Hu Jintao and President Barack Obama. Disputes between the world’s two largest economies and energy consumers over China’s wind power subsidies and its slowdown in exports of rare earths minerals, used in everything from wind turbines to cell phones, have dominated headlines in recent months. The countries are also having wider arguments. The United States says China’s currency, the yuan, is undervalued and Washington is pushing Beijing for help in persuading North Korea to abandon nuclear weapons.

But with rising concerns about oil prices, now above $90 a barrel, energy security, and global warming, officials said the world’s biggest developed country and the biggest developing country have much to learn from each other. Progress can be made on sharing technologies on efficiency, cleaner coal, and development of renewables like wind and solar power, they said.

As China tries to transform its economy from the manufacturing of cheap goods into one developing and distributing sophisticated technologies, such as clean energy, spats over intellectual property rights have already troubled trade relations between the two countries. But pressure on both countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reel in fossil fuel demand may push them to overcome these differences.

China’s Minister of Science and Technology Wan Gang spoke at a forum on U.S-China clean energy cooperation hosted by the Brookings Institution. He explained that common interests between the two countries make clean energy an issue ripe for nurturing close ties. ”I’m sure that this is one of the best points of convergence and cooperation between our two countries, and will be one of the bright spots in our future cooperation,” Wan said.

During the forum, officials from both governments unveiled plans to continue joint research and development in clean energy — electric vehicles, clean coal and energy-efficient buildings — through the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center. First announced in 2009, the centers will be supported by at least $150 million from private and public interests over five years.

In addition, several deals were signed between U.S. and Chinese companies. General Electric and China Huadian Corp signed a joint agreement for gas turbines in China that will generate $350 million in U.S. exports. GE also signed a deal with Shenhua, one of the world’s biggest coal firms, on coal gasification. The U.S. Energy Department said that the deal could lead to $100 million in U.S. exports. In addition, Alcoa and the China Power Investment Corporation signed an agreement to collaborate on a range of aluminum and clean energy projects representing $7.5 billion in potential investment both within China and abroad. U.S. utilities Duke Energy and American Electric Power also signed deals involving cleaner-burning coal.

But officials said several hurdles have to be cleared to prevent competition between the two powers from hurting clean energy efforts. Jon Huntsman, the U.S. ambassador to China, said both countries need to continue their cooperative effort to protect intellectual property rights in China. “This a critical issue in the high technology sector including clean energy, and it generates a lot of concern in both U.S. and Chinese companies,” he said. Justin Yifu Lin, a chief economist at the World Bank, said more research and development needs to be done on alternative energies like wind and solar to get them off government subsidies. Until then bickering about subsidies strain relations, as the wind power case shows. In addition, delicate balances will have to be struck between American companies that have new technologies they haven’t fully developed and Chinese ones that want to bring them to their huge market.

“In many commercial negotiations the Chinese play a very hard game of trying to trade market access for technology and American companies are always faced with the question of how much of their crown jewels they are willing to part with,” Robert Kapp, a China advisor to the Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Preston Gates Ellis law firm, told reporters in a teleconference hosted by the World Resources Institute ahead of the Obama-Hu summit. In many cases American companies have decided a certain amount of technology transfer is in their interest.

-www.reuters.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Hardware-based Ethernet switches

Hardware-based Ethernet switches


Accurate timing and synchronization is essential to achieving next-generation Smart Grids for the power industry. Manufacturer of device networking products, Moxa offers PT-7728-PTP series switches that support the IEEE 1588v2 protocol with hardware time stamping to deliver nanosecond-accurate synchronization over Ethernet networks. The switches are the newest addition to the PowerTrans series of IEC 61850-3.

“The PowerTrans has already proven its reliability in a 500-kV smart substation in Suzhou, China,” explains Leo Tsao, senior director of Moxa’s power and transportation division. ”With our switches, traffic with IEC 61850-9-1 and IEC 61850-9-2 sampled measurements can be precisely synchronized over the process bus. Protection systems are time-critical and the advanced synchronization capabilities of this technology will only grow more important in the future for electric utilities that seek to improve their monitoring and troubleshooting capabilities.”

The series switches are designed to work reliably without experiencing any communications loss under a variety of EMI phenomena commonly found in substations. The company says the highest level of reliability and availability in high voltage substation communications is achieved by combining high EMI immunity, a -40 to 85°C operating temperature range, isolated redundant power inputs, and redundancy technology. Moxa guarantees fast network fault recovery on their switches (less than 20 milliseconds), and says they also support standard STP or RSTP redundant protocols. Maximum uptime is enhanced by the use of dual redundant power supplies (24/48 VDC or 110/220 VDC/VAC).

Other product features include:

• Hardware-based IEEE 1588 PTPv2 for precise time synchronization of networks
• Verified zero packet loss under harsh EMI interference
• Turbo Ring and RSTP/STP for Ethernet redundancy
• Isolated redundant power inputs with universal 24/48 VDC or 110/220 VDC/VAC power supply range
• -40 to 85°C operating temperature range
• IEC 61850-3 and IEEE 1613 compliant

Moxa www.moxa.com


Visit the original post at: Wind Power News

Self-Cleaning Oven plus Magnifying Glass to Produce Hydrogen

The chemical engineers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, California, which is also the academic home to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have been doing a little home cooking recently to produce hydrogen.

In fact, what the engineers have developed is a modified self-cleaning over with an intense magnifying glass that uses solar energy plus a material used in self-cleaning ovens called cerium oxide (or ceria) to break down CO2 and water (H2O).

Ceria has the property of “breathing” oxygen, dissociating it from it molecules for a time at high temperatures. When it does this with water, then hydrogen can be captured and used for powering fuel cell cars and other hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Ceria has been used for years to clean off debris, baked on gunk and other stuff that accumulates over time in ovens. But, add a little solar energy and now ceria will shake and bake water into hydrogen and oxygen which can be used for fuel.

Don’t be surprised if sometime in the future a modified form of this oven is moved into your garage to cook up some hydrogen for your fuel cell car. And cooking up a big old apple pie would be a nice added touch as well.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Self-Cleaning Oven plus Magnifying Glass to Produce Hydrogen

The chemical engineers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, California, which is also the academic home to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have been doing a little home cooking recently to produce hydrogen.

In fact, what the engineers have developed is a modified self-cleaning over with an intense magnifying glass that uses solar energy plus a material used in self-cleaning ovens called cerium oxide (or ceria) to break down CO2 and water (H2O).

Ceria has the property of “breathing” oxygen, dissociating it from it molecules for a time at high temperatures. When it does this with water, then hydrogen can be captured and used for powering fuel cell cars and other hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Ceria has been used for years to clean off debris, baked on gunk and other stuff that accumulates over time in ovens. But, add a little solar energy and now ceria will shake and bake water into hydrogen and oxygen which can be used for fuel.

Don’t be surprised if sometime in the future a modified form of this oven is moved into your garage to cook up some hydrogen for your fuel cell car. And cooking up a big old apple pie would be a nice added touch as well.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Self-Cleaning Oven plus Magnifying Glass to Produce Hydrogen

The chemical engineers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, California, which is also the academic home to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have been doing a little home cooking recently to produce hydrogen.

In fact, what the engineers have developed is a modified self-cleaning over with an intense magnifying glass that uses solar energy plus a material used in self-cleaning ovens called cerium oxide (or ceria) to break down CO2 and water (H2O).

Ceria has the property of “breathing” oxygen, dissociating it from it molecules for a time at high temperatures. When it does this with water, then hydrogen can be captured and used for powering fuel cell cars and other hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Ceria has been used for years to clean off debris, baked on gunk and other stuff that accumulates over time in ovens. But, add a little solar energy and now ceria will shake and bake water into hydrogen and oxygen which can be used for fuel.

Don’t be surprised if sometime in the future a modified form of this oven is moved into your garage to cook up some hydrogen for your fuel cell car. And cooking up a big old apple pie would be a nice added touch as well.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Self-Cleaning Oven plus Magnifying Glass to Produce Hydrogen

The chemical engineers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, California, which is also the academic home to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have been doing a little home cooking recently to produce hydrogen.

In fact, what the engineers have developed is a modified self-cleaning over with an intense magnifying glass that uses solar energy plus a material used in self-cleaning ovens called cerium oxide (or ceria) to break down CO2 and water (H2O).

Ceria has the property of “breathing” oxygen, dissociating it from it molecules for a time at high temperatures. When it does this with water, then hydrogen can be captured and used for powering fuel cell cars and other hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Ceria has been used for years to clean off debris, baked on gunk and other stuff that accumulates over time in ovens. But, add a little solar energy and now ceria will shake and bake water into hydrogen and oxygen which can be used for fuel.

Don’t be surprised if sometime in the future a modified form of this oven is moved into your garage to cook up some hydrogen for your fuel cell car. And cooking up a big old apple pie would be a nice added touch as well.


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

North America Weekly: Gevo files for IPO at reduced amount
This week, Colorado-based Gevo, a developer of biobuntanol, filed to list on the NASDAQ, looking to raise $100 million, a pared-down goal from the $150 million it announced last August.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

North America Weekly: Gevo files for IPO at reduced amount
This week, Colorado-based Gevo, a developer of biobuntanol, filed to list on the NASDAQ, looking to raise $100 million, a pared-down goal from the $150 million it announced last August.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Asia Weekly: State-backed hydro-electric company IPO’s on new Laos exchange
Laos-based Electricite du Laos Generation (EdL Gen), the state-backed hydro-electric power producer, launched its IPO on the new Lao Securities Exchange.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

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