Archive for February 1st, 2011

Recycle The Essential Guide

Recycle The Essential Guide

How often do you go about your day in our great city, only to be frustrated by the ubiquity of single-use containers and products and the lack of public recyclinjg services? Have you ever wondered whether our garbage system is as modern and efficient as it can possibly be? NYC’s garbage issues are the great unseen environmental problem that looms over us from afar, as we ship our solid waste out of state to be landfilled and only recycle a small percentage of our used plastics.

The City Council has been taking steps to correct that situation though, and starting in April 2011, electronics manufacturers will be required to take back their products for recycling, and by 2015, it will no longer be legal to leave consumer electronics for residential trash collection. The city is also trying to find ways to expand the municipal composting program- as Lucy Siegle, environmental journalist for The Observer newspaper, explains in the introduction to Recycle The Essential Guide, organic material in the landfill is actually worse than inorganic material , because it leaches toxins into the ground, and also releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Currently, the nearest commercial composting center to NYC is in Delaware- no wonder it’s so difficult to get rid of our compostable plastic cups every summer!

All of which is to say, if you are interested in sustainability, creative reuse and waste management, you are probably already quite busy recycling everything you possibly can- and you will definitely enjoy this book.

Published in a new edition by Black Dog Publishing, this well-designed and information-packed guide makes a clear argument for increased recycling. Organized into sections by material, the book covers paper, plastic, glass, e-waste, textiles and metals with eye-catching graphics, bold colors and case studies from around the world.

While much of the information and resources focus on the UK, there’s still plenty to interest an American reader, including detailed explanations of the recycling processes and a fair evaluation of the resources expended in the various recycling schemes explored in the book. I also enjoyed the pull quotes that featured prominently throughout- well-known thinkers and activists in the climate crisis field providing clear, inspiring soundbites that articulate the need for more extensive recycling, especially here in the US.

As the stories in Recycle The Essential Guide show, recycling is not only a vital part of a total sustainability plan in any community, taking on waste issues head-on is a great relationship builder in communities around the world. Recycling means cleaner environments, increased job opportunities and fewer landfills. Recycling FTW!

Available from Black Dog Publishing. Click here!


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Recycle The Essential Guide

Recycle The Essential Guide

How often do you go about your day in our great city, only to be frustrated by the ubiquity of single-use containers and products and the lack of public recyclinjg services? Have you ever wondered whether our garbage system is as modern and efficient as it can possibly be? NYC’s garbage issues are the great unseen environmental problem that looms over us from afar, as we ship our solid waste out of state to be landfilled and only recycle a small percentage of our used plastics.

The City Council has been taking steps to correct that situation though, and starting in April 2011, electronics manufacturers will be required to take back their products for recycling, and by 2015, it will no longer be legal to leave consumer electronics for residential trash collection. The city is also trying to find ways to expand the municipal composting program- as Lucy Siegle, environmental journalist for The Observer newspaper, explains in the introduction to Recycle The Essential Guide, organic material in the landfill is actually worse than inorganic material , because it leaches toxins into the ground, and also releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Currently, the nearest commercial composting center to NYC is in Delaware- no wonder it’s so difficult to get rid of our compostable plastic cups every summer!

All of which is to say, if you are interested in sustainability, creative reuse and waste management, you are probably already quite busy recycling everything you possibly can- and you will definitely enjoy this book.

Published in a new edition by Black Dog Publishing, this well-designed and information-packed guide makes a clear argument for increased recycling. Organized into sections by material, the book covers paper, plastic, glass, e-waste, textiles and metals with eye-catching graphics, bold colors and case studies from around the world.

While much of the information and resources focus on the UK, there’s still plenty to interest an American reader, including detailed explanations of the recycling processes and a fair evaluation of the resources expended in the various recycling schemes explored in the book. I also enjoyed the pull quotes that featured prominently throughout- well-known thinkers and activists in the climate crisis field providing clear, inspiring soundbites that articulate the need for more extensive recycling, especially here in the US.

As the stories in Recycle The Essential Guide show, recycling is not only a vital part of a total sustainability plan in any community, taking on waste issues head-on is a great relationship builder in communities around the world. Recycling means cleaner environments, increased job opportunities and fewer landfills. Recycling FTW!

Available from Black Dog Publishing. Click here!


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Recycle The Essential Guide

Recycle The Essential Guide

How often do you go about your day in our great city, only to be frustrated by the ubiquity of single-use containers and products and the lack of public recyclinjg services? Have you ever wondered whether our garbage system is as modern and efficient as it can possibly be? NYC’s garbage issues are the great unseen environmental problem that looms over us from afar, as we ship our solid waste out of state to be landfilled and only recycle a small percentage of our used plastics.

The City Council has been taking steps to correct that situation though, and starting in April 2011, electronics manufacturers will be required to take back their products for recycling, and by 2015, it will no longer be legal to leave consumer electronics for residential trash collection. The city is also trying to find ways to expand the municipal composting program- as Lucy Siegle, environmental journalist for The Observer newspaper, explains in the introduction to Recycle The Essential Guide, organic material in the landfill is actually worse than inorganic material , because it leaches toxins into the ground, and also releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Currently, the nearest commercial composting center to NYC is in Delaware- no wonder it’s so difficult to get rid of our compostable plastic cups every summer!

All of which is to say, if you are interested in sustainability, creative reuse and waste management, you are probably already quite busy recycling everything you possibly can- and you will definitely enjoy this book.

Published in a new edition by Black Dog Publishing, this well-designed and information-packed guide makes a clear argument for increased recycling. Organized into sections by material, the book covers paper, plastic, glass, e-waste, textiles and metals with eye-catching graphics, bold colors and case studies from around the world.

While much of the information and resources focus on the UK, there’s still plenty to interest an American reader, including detailed explanations of the recycling processes and a fair evaluation of the resources expended in the various recycling schemes explored in the book. I also enjoyed the pull quotes that featured prominently throughout- well-known thinkers and activists in the climate crisis field providing clear, inspiring soundbites that articulate the need for more extensive recycling, especially here in the US.

As the stories in Recycle The Essential Guide show, recycling is not only a vital part of a total sustainability plan in any community, taking on waste issues head-on is a great relationship builder in communities around the world. Recycling means cleaner environments, increased job opportunities and fewer landfills. Recycling FTW!

Available from Black Dog Publishing. Click here!


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Home Made Solar Death Ray!

Home Made Solar Death Ray!
This homemade “Death Ray” is a fiberglass satellite dish covered with approximately 5,800 mirrored tiles. Inventor Eric Jacqmain claims the Death Ray produces laser like spot the size of a dime that has the power of 5,000 suns! Eric named it the R5800.

In this video he focuses the Death Ray on concreate, a rock, water filled glass tube, etc. – everything heats up and flames out:

Ironically, Eric’s Death Ray with the power of 5000 suns was destroyed in a burning shed in December of 2010.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Home Made Solar Death Ray!

Home Made Solar Death Ray!
This homemade “Death Ray” is a fiberglass satellite dish covered with approximately 5,800 mirrored tiles. Inventor Eric Jacqmain claims the Death Ray produces laser like spot the size of a dime that has the power of 5,000 suns! Eric named it the R5800.

In this video he focuses the Death Ray on concreate, a rock, water filled glass tube, etc. – everything heats up and flames out:

Ironically, Eric’s Death Ray with the power of 5000 suns was destroyed in a burning shed in December of 2010.


Visit the original post at: Solar Power News

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Filed under: , , ,

Aesthetics 125 and 1886 Benz Patent-MotorWagen

Daimler celebrates 125 years since Carl Benz’s Patent-MotorWagen – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back on January 29th of 1886, Karl Benz filed the patent for his “vehicle with gas-engine drive.” It’s an important date in the history of the automobile, and Daimler is looking back at that special day that occurred 125 years ago and also using the anniversary of that day to look towards the future.

Daimler is embarking on a world tour to show off its Mercedes-Benz vehicles powered by fuel-cells. Over the course of 125 days, B-Class vehicles fitted with fuel cells will be touted all over the globe. As a nod to the past, the automaker received a new patent 125 years to the day that the original one was created. The bi-polar flat-cell frame is a brand-new technological development that will aid in the creation of lithium-ion batteries.

Mercedes-Benz took advantage of the 125th-anniversary celebrations to use art as a means of highlighting its own future. Thanks to rapid-prototyping technology, engineers were quickly able to produce a sculpture that started life as data in a computer. Called Aesthetics 125, the piece shows the level of technological sophistication available today while hinting at the design language of tomorrow.

Daimler is excited for the 125th anniversary of Mr. Benz’s wagon, and 2011 is chock full of milestones and further reasons to celebrate. Read all about them in the full press-release posted after the jump.

[Source: Daimler]

Continue reading Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Tue, 01 Feb 2011 10:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Filed under: , , ,

Aesthetics 125 and 1886 Benz Patent-MotorWagen

Daimler celebrates 125 years since Carl Benz’s Patent-MotorWagen – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back on January 29th of 1886, Karl Benz filed the patent for his “vehicle with gas-engine drive.” It’s an important date in the history of the automobile, and Daimler is looking back at that special day that occurred 125 years ago and also using the anniversary of that day to look towards the future.

Daimler is embarking on a world tour to show off its Mercedes-Benz vehicles powered by fuel-cells. Over the course of 125 days, B-Class vehicles fitted with fuel cells will be touted all over the globe. As a nod to the past, the automaker received a new patent 125 years to the day that the original one was created. The bi-polar flat-cell frame is a brand-new technological development that will aid in the creation of lithium-ion batteries.

Mercedes-Benz took advantage of the 125th-anniversary celebrations to use art as a means of highlighting its own future. Thanks to rapid-prototyping technology, engineers were quickly able to produce a sculpture that started life as data in a computer. Called Aesthetics 125, the piece shows the level of technological sophistication available today while hinting at the design language of tomorrow.

Daimler is excited for the 125th anniversary of Mr. Benz’s wagon, and 2011 is chock full of milestones and further reasons to celebrate. Read all about them in the full press-release posted after the jump.

[Source: Daimler]

Continue reading Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Tue, 01 Feb 2011 10:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Filed under: , , ,

Aesthetics 125 and 1886 Benz Patent-MotorWagen

Daimler celebrates 125 years since Carl Benz’s Patent-MotorWagen – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back on January 29th of 1886, Karl Benz filed the patent for his “vehicle with gas-engine drive.” It’s an important date in the history of the automobile, and Daimler is looking back at that special day that occurred 125 years ago and also using the anniversary of that day to look towards the future.

Daimler is embarking on a world tour to show off its Mercedes-Benz vehicles powered by fuel-cells. Over the course of 125 days, B-Class vehicles fitted with fuel cells will be touted all over the globe. As a nod to the past, the automaker received a new patent 125 years to the day that the original one was created. The bi-polar flat-cell frame is a brand-new technological development that will aid in the creation of lithium-ion batteries.

Mercedes-Benz took advantage of the 125th-anniversary celebrations to use art as a means of highlighting its own future. Thanks to rapid-prototyping technology, engineers were quickly able to produce a sculpture that started life as data in a computer. Called Aesthetics 125, the piece shows the level of technological sophistication available today while hinting at the design language of tomorrow.

Daimler is excited for the 125th anniversary of Mr. Benz’s wagon, and 2011 is chock full of milestones and further reasons to celebrate. Read all about them in the full press-release posted after the jump.

[Source: Daimler]

Continue reading Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Tue, 01 Feb 2011 10:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Filed under: , , ,

Aesthetics 125 and 1886 Benz Patent-MotorWagen

Daimler celebrates 125 years since Carl Benz’s Patent-MotorWagen – Click above for high-res image gallery

Back on January 29th of 1886, Karl Benz filed the patent for his “vehicle with gas-engine drive.” It’s an important date in the history of the automobile, and Daimler is looking back at that special day that occurred 125 years ago and also using the anniversary of that day to look towards the future.

Daimler is embarking on a world tour to show off its Mercedes-Benz vehicles powered by fuel-cells. Over the course of 125 days, B-Class vehicles fitted with fuel cells will be touted all over the globe. As a nod to the past, the automaker received a new patent 125 years to the day that the original one was created. The bi-polar flat-cell frame is a brand-new technological development that will aid in the creation of lithium-ion batteries.

Mercedes-Benz took advantage of the 125th-anniversary celebrations to use art as a means of highlighting its own future. Thanks to rapid-prototyping technology, engineers were quickly able to produce a sculpture that started life as data in a computer. Called Aesthetics 125, the piece shows the level of technological sophistication available today while hinting at the design language of tomorrow.

Daimler is excited for the 125th anniversary of Mr. Benz’s wagon, and 2011 is chock full of milestones and further reasons to celebrate. Read all about them in the full press-release posted after the jump.

[Source: Daimler]

Continue reading Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent

Mercedes-Benz Celebrates 125 years with sculpture, battery patent originally appeared on Autoblog Green on Tue, 01 Feb 2011 10:59:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments


Visit the original post at: Fuel Cell News

“Pants on Fire!” says Truth-o-Meter to health problems from turbine shadow flicker

From an article on Political Fact Check:

To some, spinning wind turbines are a majestic source of pollution-free energy. But when they’re proposed for residential areas, opponents often portray them as a menace to healthy, safety, aesthetics and property values.

The rhetoric can get pretty extreme.

When one was proposed in Barrington in 2008, opponents claimed that unnamed “independent medical experts” had found that turbines can cause everything from headaches to heart problems, and that sunlight flashing through the blades can produce a stroboscopic effect that may lead to nausea, dizziness, disorientation and seizures.

So when a massive 427-foot turbine was proposed for Stamp Farm on Route 2 in North Kingstown, it wasn’t surprising that the opposition would echo those claims. One opponent was state Rep. Laurence Ehrhardt of North Kingstown. He co-authored an opinion column published in The Providence Journal with former North Kingstown Town Council President Edward Cooney.

For one of their bullet points, they played the epilepsy card: “The health risk of ‘flicker’ impact created by shadows of blades of turbines poses real and significant health risks, particularly seizures. . . .”

We contacted two epilepsy experts who said the concern was ridiculous because it was so unlikely.

David Mandelbaum, a neurologist and pediatrician at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, said even if an epileptic is sensitive to light, the flicker has to be at just the right frequency, and that frequency can vary widely from person to person.

Dr. Gregory Kent Bergey, director of the epilepsy center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in an email: “The fact is, the great majority of people with seizures [probably greater than 95 percent] do not have this photosensitivity.” Some patients may experience a brief spasm if they see the sun coming through the trees, “but these seizures are usually readily controlled by medication. I do not tell these patients not to drive in the forest!”

He said “the risk from sun coming through a wind turbine would be very small — the person would first have to be looking at the sun, not just at a turbine, and most of us know not to look at the sun directly. . . . We cannot use this as a reason not to erect wind turbine farms.”

Mandelbaum said he has never seen any reliable documentation that turbines can cause seizures, or any other health problems. “They’re using the epileptic community. It’s clever and it’s nonsense, and I find it personally offensive,” he said.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

“Pants on Fire!” says Truth-o-Meter to health problems from turbine shadow flicker

From an article on Political Fact Check:

To some, spinning wind turbines are a majestic source of pollution-free energy. But when they’re proposed for residential areas, opponents often portray them as a menace to healthy, safety, aesthetics and property values.

The rhetoric can get pretty extreme.

When one was proposed in Barrington in 2008, opponents claimed that unnamed “independent medical experts” had found that turbines can cause everything from headaches to heart problems, and that sunlight flashing through the blades can produce a stroboscopic effect that may lead to nausea, dizziness, disorientation and seizures.

So when a massive 427-foot turbine was proposed for Stamp Farm on Route 2 in North Kingstown, it wasn’t surprising that the opposition would echo those claims. One opponent was state Rep. Laurence Ehrhardt of North Kingstown. He co-authored an opinion column published in The Providence Journal with former North Kingstown Town Council President Edward Cooney.

For one of their bullet points, they played the epilepsy card: “The health risk of ‘flicker’ impact created by shadows of blades of turbines poses real and significant health risks, particularly seizures. . . .”

We contacted two epilepsy experts who said the concern was ridiculous because it was so unlikely.

David Mandelbaum, a neurologist and pediatrician at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, said even if an epileptic is sensitive to light, the flicker has to be at just the right frequency, and that frequency can vary widely from person to person.

Dr. Gregory Kent Bergey, director of the epilepsy center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in an email: “The fact is, the great majority of people with seizures [probably greater than 95 percent] do not have this photosensitivity.” Some patients may experience a brief spasm if they see the sun coming through the trees, “but these seizures are usually readily controlled by medication. I do not tell these patients not to drive in the forest!”

He said “the risk from sun coming through a wind turbine would be very small — the person would first have to be looking at the sun, not just at a turbine, and most of us know not to look at the sun directly. . . . We cannot use this as a reason not to erect wind turbine farms.”

Mandelbaum said he has never seen any reliable documentation that turbines can cause seizures, or any other health problems. “They’re using the epileptic community. It’s clever and it’s nonsense, and I find it personally offensive,” he said.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

“Pants on Fire!” says Truth-o-Meter to health problems from turbine shadow flicker

From an article on Political Fact Check:

To some, spinning wind turbines are a majestic source of pollution-free energy. But when they’re proposed for residential areas, opponents often portray them as a menace to healthy, safety, aesthetics and property values.

The rhetoric can get pretty extreme.

When one was proposed in Barrington in 2008, opponents claimed that unnamed “independent medical experts” had found that turbines can cause everything from headaches to heart problems, and that sunlight flashing through the blades can produce a stroboscopic effect that may lead to nausea, dizziness, disorientation and seizures.

So when a massive 427-foot turbine was proposed for Stamp Farm on Route 2 in North Kingstown, it wasn’t surprising that the opposition would echo those claims. One opponent was state Rep. Laurence Ehrhardt of North Kingstown. He co-authored an opinion column published in The Providence Journal with former North Kingstown Town Council President Edward Cooney.

For one of their bullet points, they played the epilepsy card: “The health risk of ‘flicker’ impact created by shadows of blades of turbines poses real and significant health risks, particularly seizures. . . .”

We contacted two epilepsy experts who said the concern was ridiculous because it was so unlikely.

David Mandelbaum, a neurologist and pediatrician at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, said even if an epileptic is sensitive to light, the flicker has to be at just the right frequency, and that frequency can vary widely from person to person.

Dr. Gregory Kent Bergey, director of the epilepsy center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in an email: “The fact is, the great majority of people with seizures [probably greater than 95 percent] do not have this photosensitivity.” Some patients may experience a brief spasm if they see the sun coming through the trees, “but these seizures are usually readily controlled by medication. I do not tell these patients not to drive in the forest!”

He said “the risk from sun coming through a wind turbine would be very small — the person would first have to be looking at the sun, not just at a turbine, and most of us know not to look at the sun directly. . . . We cannot use this as a reason not to erect wind turbine farms.”

Mandelbaum said he has never seen any reliable documentation that turbines can cause seizures, or any other health problems. “They’re using the epileptic community. It’s clever and it’s nonsense, and I find it personally offensive,” he said.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

“Pants on Fire!” says Truth-o-Meter to health problems from turbine shadow flicker

From an article on Political Fact Check:

To some, spinning wind turbines are a majestic source of pollution-free energy. But when they’re proposed for residential areas, opponents often portray them as a menace to healthy, safety, aesthetics and property values.

The rhetoric can get pretty extreme.

When one was proposed in Barrington in 2008, opponents claimed that unnamed “independent medical experts” had found that turbines can cause everything from headaches to heart problems, and that sunlight flashing through the blades can produce a stroboscopic effect that may lead to nausea, dizziness, disorientation and seizures.

So when a massive 427-foot turbine was proposed for Stamp Farm on Route 2 in North Kingstown, it wasn’t surprising that the opposition would echo those claims. One opponent was state Rep. Laurence Ehrhardt of North Kingstown. He co-authored an opinion column published in The Providence Journal with former North Kingstown Town Council President Edward Cooney.

For one of their bullet points, they played the epilepsy card: “The health risk of ‘flicker’ impact created by shadows of blades of turbines poses real and significant health risks, particularly seizures. . . .”

We contacted two epilepsy experts who said the concern was ridiculous because it was so unlikely.

David Mandelbaum, a neurologist and pediatrician at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, said even if an epileptic is sensitive to light, the flicker has to be at just the right frequency, and that frequency can vary widely from person to person.

Dr. Gregory Kent Bergey, director of the epilepsy center at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, said in an email: “The fact is, the great majority of people with seizures [probably greater than 95 percent] do not have this photosensitivity.” Some patients may experience a brief spasm if they see the sun coming through the trees, “but these seizures are usually readily controlled by medication. I do not tell these patients not to drive in the forest!”

He said “the risk from sun coming through a wind turbine would be very small — the person would first have to be looking at the sun, not just at a turbine, and most of us know not to look at the sun directly. . . . We cannot use this as a reason not to erect wind turbine farms.”

Mandelbaum said he has never seen any reliable documentation that turbines can cause seizures, or any other health problems. “They’re using the epileptic community. It’s clever and it’s nonsense, and I find it personally offensive,” he said.


Visit the original post at: Energy News

Regen partners with Los Angeles Department of Water and Power on electric-car charging project

I mentioned back in July that Regen Energy of Toronto was in talks with a California utility about testing its “swarm logic” technology for the managing of electric-car charging loads on the local grid. At the DistribuTECH conference in San Diego the company announced the utility as the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which has an ongoing Smart Grid EV integration prjoect funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Regen says California utilities have serious concerns about the potential for rapid deployment of EVs to overwhelm their local distribution assets, largely because city’s such as Los Angeles are likely to have relatively higher concentrations of EV owners. That is, green-minded California consumers tend to be early adopters of these technologies.

“Our EnviroGrid technology platform has been proven widely for commercial HVAC demand management and demand response applications,” according to Regen chief executive Tim Angus. “HVAC often represents 60 per cent of total building load, however the emerging adoption of EVs will quickly place significant stress on the grid both from a building and city level.”

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